MISCHA MAISKY Morgen Pavel Gililov 4777465

The cellist plunges heart and soul into this romantic-flavoured recital with the pianist Pavel Gililov. The pairżs passion helps to glue together the extravagances of Straussżs Cello Sonata . . . DGżs recording lets us feel Maiskyżs every throb and tear . . .

Mischa Maisky and Pavel Gililov wholeheartedly respond, going at the powerful first movement . . . [Dvorák's Sonatina]: Maisky takes it with a light touch . . . [Dvorák's Four Romantic Pieces]: . . . the Rondo . . . is charmingly played. An excellent recording . . .

Maisky's performance of these works could hardly be bettered. Strauss's Sonata has enormous youthful élan, and the arrangements of the Romance for cello and orchestra and "Morgen" are exquisite. The expertly made Dvorák arrangements fare equally well in fact, the performance of the Sonatina matches the finest violin readings with a superb sense of engagement and ensemble in the faster movements. Excellently recorded, this recital winds on all counts.

Mischa Maisky's warm, romantic tone and controlled vibrato are an excellent match for Strauss, and the pairing is even better in Maisky's own arrangement of "Morgen" -- I don't miss the human voice here at all. Pavel Gililov is definitely a capable partner . . . [Rondo]: Maisky and Gililov make the opening theme sound like a fan dance, with all their pushing and pulling at the tempo. Overall, I like the sounds that Maisky makes on this CD as much as I ever do . . .

Both composers require a Romantic, lyrical delivery, a style of playing that is the absolute domain of Mischa Maisky. Astutely partnered by Pavel Gililov in this warm and clear recording, he carefully reigns in the tempestuous invention of Strauss's first movement, contrasting a light and delicate articulation in the fugato passages with a boldly fervent presentation of the richly sumptuous melodies. This youthful sonata teems with freshness, a quality particularly well evoked in this Allegro con brio, while the intimate and atmospheric Andante has both poise an poetry, its hushed melodies unexpectedly making way for an eyquisitely soaring moment of melancholic intensity. In maximising the characterisation of Strauss's material, these artists produce a winning account of the Finale, which is full of the requisite whimsy. The Romanze unfolds in a similarly expressive manner. Transcriptions have long been part of Maisky's armoury and he perfectly conveys the painfully beautiful nostalgia of "Morgen" in his own arrangement of Strauss's song. Equally, Dvorák's Violin Sonatina transfers to the cello very effectively, and both artists grace the invention with a sure feeling for its Bohemian colouring. The Scherzo is playful and the concluding Allegro ha plenty of bravura. Maisky and Gililov both revel in the unbashed virtuosity of the Rondo, which audaciously oscillates between captivating melodies and cascading sequences, and the pyrotechnics never get in the way of simple charm

[R. Strauss]: . . . dans cette veine néoromantique, la sonate gagne une belle intensité doublée d'un élan maintenu sans chute de tension.