BACH The Cello Suites Jian Wang 4775228

. . . symbolic and full of energy . . .

Wang is assuredly a great cellist. In a world increasingly full of great recordings of them, these by the young cellist instantly take an important place.

[Wang's] eloquent playing, which has much of the flexibility and grace of the legendary Casals in this repertory, draws the listener deep into the music. Wang exudes emotion in his interpretations without cheapening one phrase or stifling the flow of Bach's far-reaching melodic lines.

Wang's new CD is quite beautiful . . . Throughout he manages to draw out a soulful depth that makes these works very much his own.

Wang's bow control projects lyrical melody above restrained harmony and repeats, rather than sounding literal, become developed expansions of the first playing of each half-dance . . . this is wonderfully imaginative playing, with fine recording picking up a resonant bloom without obscuring detail -- a "must" for any collection.

That deep-seated, big-picture view of Bach and where his music fits into our inner lives is what Wang brings to the table and it is what he expresses so ably through his artistry.

With 60 recordings of these suites already available, to make a mark among such a host requires at the very least superlative technique, a deep understanding of French courtly dance and a musical personality modest enough to reflect and complement, rather than impose on, Bach's intentions. Jian Wang plays outmoded Allemandes fairly freely, though he holds the notoriously slow final one on a firm rein. Faster dances are superbly metrical but never inflexible as he bends rhythms around the underlying
pulse. They are full of character, too -- the third Allemande strutting proudly; the first Minuet with elegantly lifted steps; the final Gigue . . . with never a hint of hesitation at the fistfuls of multiple stops. Wang's bow control projects lyrical melody above restrained harmony and repeats, rather than sounding literal, become developed expansions of the first playing of each half-dance. The six Preludes, each strikingly different, are full of contrasting character. . . this is wonderful imaginative playing, with fine recording picking up a resonant bloom without obscuring details -- a "must" for any collection.

The deep-seated, big-picture view of Bach and where his music fits into our inner lives is what Wang brings to the table and it is what he expresses so ably through his artistry.

Here we have nothing but tenderness, both in the silky caresses of his playing and in the conception . . . This is not a definitive reading, though for its exquisite musicianship a compelling one nevertheless.

. . . great melding of dance-like, up-tempo period readings, and more Romantic or subjective interpretations.

C'est une version inspirée du romantisme comme du baroque, yin et yang si l'on peut dire, qu'interprète Jian Wang, avec une liberté d'agogique qui paraît parfois incroyablement romantique, et, en même temps, des phrases très découpées et des articulations variées : c'est du très beau violoncelle, à la sonorité riche, pure et équilibrée. . .

Uno de los grandes logros de Wang es esa constante serenidad que emana de su instrumento, sin que la austeridad sea un sinónimo de aridez o severidad. Su Bach, sencillamente, es tan libre como el pensamiento que deja volar mientras lo toca.

Wang toca las obras con lo que parece una extraordinaria serenidad de espíritu.