HAYDN The Creation Piau Padmore McCreesh 4777361

. . . Paul McCreesh's emendations are . . . more successful, retaining all the Milton-inspired quaintness of van Swieten's text while rectifying his mistranslations and clumsy Germanic word order . . . Abetted by the glowing, spacious acoustics of Watford Town Hall, the big celebratory choruses make a more powerful impact than in any of the rival period versions . . . there is no denying the incandescence of the climaxes of "The heavens are telling" and the final "Praise the Lord, uplift your voices". In all the choruses McCreesh's pacing -- eager but never hectic -- and rhythmic energy are wonderfully inspiriting . . . McCreesh's trump card is his solo team, superb both individually and as an exceptionally sensitive ensemble. I can't recall ever hearing the trio near the close of Part 2, "On thee each living soul awaits", sung with such radiant inwardness. Other highlights include Sandrine Piau's graceful, smiling "With verdure clad", here a truly happy song to the spring . . . for a "Creation" in English, this new version -- exhilarating, poetic and marvellously sung -- becomes the prime recommendation.

. . . this release comprises one of the most impressive feats of engineering that I have ever encountered. From its timbral accuracy to its extraordinary dynamic range it comes closer to in-hall reality than any other recording of "The Creation" I've heard. Never has the chorus sounded so well focused, its words clearly discernible . . . so powerful is the sonic impact throughout the production, even a whispered piano, soft as it is, seems physically palpable . . . Under McCreesh the choral textures are more clearly focused, the orchestral choirs more cleanly delineated, features as much a credit to the conductor as to the engineering. Of course the performance is the prime issue . . . McCreesh's pacing for this passage is considerably slower than that of other conductors. The effect is stunning, providing greater clarification of the chromatic richness and daring of the entire section. Like most 'period' versions, this one is free of the comparative stodginess and muddiness that has stamped the work of more celebrated conductors . . . this release is the 'period' version to have . . .

Particularly impressive is a release of Haydn's "Creation" . . . it boasts exceptional clarity and power. Sonically, it is as realistic a recording of a group this size as any I have heard, the clarity of the English in choral passages being extraordinary. For anyone seeking a period-instrument version, this well-paced, dramatic account superbly led by Paul McCreesh may prove a preferred edition.

McCreesh's exceedingly well-sung and ¿played account of the piece is distinguished by its energy, fervor, grace, and often-overwhelming power, which convey both the transcendent majesty and the disarming tenderness of this masterpiece.

Das Ergebnis dieser Mammutbesetzung ist frappierend . . . durch das größere Volumen steigert sich auch die Erhabenheit der großen Chorsätze ins Grandiose, was dieser Musik unerhört gut steht. Selten hat der dem Duett von Adam und Eva im dritten Teil untermischte Lobgesang des Chors so viel Geheimnis und Größe ausgestrahlt, selten waren die Fugen so überwältigend und doch so deutlich ausformuliert zu hören. Die bestechenden Solisten, allen voran der nuanciert gestaltende Mark Padmore und Neal Davies als eloquenter Erzengel Raphael, setzen in den Arien und Duetten gleich einen Höhepunkt nach dem anderen.

. . . alles ist "natürlich" höchste Kunst . . . Mark Padmore als Lichtengel Uriel strahlt förmlich, singt mit gelassener Überlegenheit. Sandrine Piaus stets exakt geführte, schlanke Stimme verrät Ordnungssinn und einen starken Gestaltungswillen, der aber die klassische Form nie verletzt -- und genau darum geht es in Haydns "Schöpfung".

. . . durch das größere Volumen steigert sich auch die Erhabenheit der großen Chorsätze ins Grandiose, was dieser Musik unerhört gut steht. Selten hat der dem Duett von Adam und Eva im dritten Teil untermischte Lobgesang des Chors so viel Geheimnis und Größe ausgestrahlt, selten waren die Fugen so überwältigend und doch so deutlich ausformuliert zu hören. Die bestechenden Solisten, allen voran der nuanciert gestaltende Mark Padmore und Neal Davies als eloquenter Erzengel Raphael, setzen in den Arien und Duetten gleich einen Höhepunkt nach dem anderen.

Mit Mark Padmore hat McCreesh einen stimmlich edlen und phantasievoll gestaltenden Erzengel Uriel in seinem Ensemble, mit Neal Davies einen kraftvollen, bestechend eloquenten Raphael . . .

Mein Klassiker: So stimmig und wärmend wie ein reifer Port.

. . . alles ist "natürlich" höchste Kunst . . . Eine interessante Vorstellung des ersten Paars! Mark Padmore als Lichtengel Uriel strahlt förmlich, singt mit gelassener Überlegenheit und einem himmlischen Vibrato-Beben. Sandrine Piaus (als Raphael) stets exakt geführte, schlanke Stimme verrät Ordnungssinn und einen starken Gestaltungswillen, der aber die klassische Form nie verletzt ¿ und genau darum geht es in Haydns "Schöpfung".