BRAHMS Violin Concerto Repin Chailly 4777470

Repin's technique is as fearsome as his musical energy, intelligence, and curiosity. Considering that his musical heritage includes not only the splendid virtuosity of Auer, but the classical perfection of Russian violin virtuoso David Oistrakh, it is no wonder that his performances of the Brahms Concerto are so compelling.

. . . his finest playing on disc to date. His tone has always been sumptuous, but, taking his cue from Henrik Wahlgren¿s serene oboe solo in the adagio, he has never sounded more expressive. This is raptly beautiful playing and the Leipzigers rise to the no less important orchestral parts. In the outer movements, and the Double Concerto, with Truls Mork¿s eloquent cello, Chailly brings symphonic rigour and high drama to Brahms¿s scores. It is hard to think of recent recordings of these great works that match the splendour of sound and musical insight here. Superb.

As is immediately apparent from the well-upholstered orchestral sound, with strings well to the fore, and luxuriant phrasing coaxed throughout by Riccardo Chailly . . . Vadim Repin is temperamentally closest to Stern's all-embracing vision, and like Stern's his playing dominates the soundscape . . . Repin's effortless fluency and intonational accuracy are constant sources of pleasure in a work notorious for showing up any rough edges in a player's technique. He employs an unusually wide range of dynamics, gently stealing in during the more lyrical entries, thereby imparting a special sense of give-and-take with the orchestra and a meditative stillness which the white-hot intensity of Stern rarely allows . . . this is undeniably one of the finest versions to have appeared in recent years . . . Repin and Chailly veer towards the warmly affectionate, gently cajoling our senses without unduly ruffling our emotional feathers. Much the same can be said of the Double Concerto, which seduces simply by the sound it makes . . . There is real magic in the air whenever Brahms takes a musical intake of breath, with orchestra and soloists producing a velvety sound of captivating inwardness. Repin and Truls Mørk match their tone to a remarkable degree, negotiating the awkwardness of Brahms's Joachim-edited figurations with a fluidity and jewelled precision that makes exquisite passages . . . I cannot imagine anyone investing in this fine disc being anything less than deeply impressed by its winning combination of beguiling musicianship and phenomenal expertise.

. . . this is a performance on the grandest of scales, full of high drama and extravagant rhetorical gestures. Conducted by Riccardo Chailly, it's also notably slow. The dividends are enormous in the second half: the adagio has great nobility, while the finale is weighty and detailed as well as virtuosic . . . [Double Concerto]: This is a wonderful performance . . . Chailly's conducting has cragginess as well as grandeur, while Repin and Mork are thrilling and tender. Recommended . . .

Brahms¿ Violin Concerto is one of the big, grand romantic violin concertos and deserves to be treated well in the grand manner. This is what it gets here in this new recording by Vadim Repin and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra under Riccardo Chailly. Repin has a full tone and makes his instrument sing like an operatic star, but his grandeur has nothing worldly or simply ceremonial about it. He plays truly and sincerely. In this respect, he is well partnered by Chailly . . . Vadim Repin is a young musician, but his maturity and assurance is clearly demonstrated here. The Brahms Concerto deserves your full attention and yields great returns. I loved the operatic grandeur and bold sweep of the opening movement and was pleased that few concessions were made to Viennese heart-tugging with the slow movement. Nothing is thrown away in the finale and it all ends at full throttle. There is no sense of rush in this performance . . . Proceedings here are firm, measured and well-paced, but always have a strong sense of moving forward. This is Delphic and Palladian in its majesty and sweep. I speak as a Bathonian when I say this is the Royal Crescent of Brahms¿ Concertos. It is well-matched with a performance of the Double Concerto for Violin and Cello where Repin is partnered by Truls Mork seems less divine and rather more companionable. The slow movement, in particular, shows the true partnership where you have the real sense of the performers listening to one another. Again, this performance has something operatic about it. This is not a contest between two soloists, but truly duet playing. And I wanted to cheer at the end.

This is . . . a disc that offers beauty and thought-provoking musicianship in equal measure. And I admire Chailly greatly as a Brahmsian who never loses sight of the essential classicism at the heart of his writing. That said, Chailly also conveys wonderfully well the epic quality of the huge opening tutti . . . Repin relishes the work's moments of delicacy as much as the declamatory ones. Nothing is ever effortful: even the tortuous double-stopping seems to leave him entirely unfazed. The first-movement cadenza, too, is ease personified. The slow movement is one of the highlights of the CD, and it's good to have a credit for the solo oboist, who duets with Repin quite ravishingly . . . what's striking about this reading is how little conflict you sense between soloist and orchestra . . . Repin is such a persuasive artist that it's easy to be seduced by the results . . . The disc is worth hearing for the Violin Concerto alone . . .

His dazzling technique aside, the firm, warm tone, magnificent control of phrasing and rhythmic incisiveness are all tailor-made for the piece. It's an impressively full-blooded reading; the sense of gypsy abandonment that he brings to the finale is most infectious, and Riccardo Chailly's direction of the Gewandhausorchester is with him all the way . . . Repin is joined by Truls Mørk for an equally memorable account of the Double Concerto. They work excellently as a team; the warmth and skill they bring to the Andante, characterising their instruments as the two protagonists of an intimate dialogue, makes this the high-point of the disc. If you want a coupling of these two concertos this is certainly now the version to get . . .

. . . the effect in this performance does create a strong impression of unanimity, and the interaction of the two soloists, not only with each other but also with the orchestral forces-particularly with the wind instruments-makes for some affecting and deeply engaging moments . . .

. . . until I heard this much-anticipated recording, I could not have believed it was possible for the Brahms Violin Concerto to be played with such a combination of consummate technical mastery, interpretive originality, and musically penetrating insight . . . it is in his interpretive approach that Repin makes of Brahms's Concerto something very personal and very special . . . Magnificent and magnanimous as Repin's playing is, the full splendor of this performance is realized in the most integrated and scrupulously managed orchestral contribution I've ever heard in this work; and for that, equal credit must go to Riccardo Chailly and the Gewandhaus Orchestra. Chailly anticipates every one of Repin's nuanced rubatos and expressive phrasings in such a way that soloist and orchestra unerringly coalesce, coincide, and cadence in perfect unanimity . . . Mork reveals, through rubato and expressive phrasing, the many subtleties concealed in the cello's opening recitative . . . Given solo and orchestral playing of such extraordinary excellence, I cannot help but give this release a resounding recommendation.

. . . one of the most beautiful recordings of the Brahms Violin Concerto ever made. First, there is Vadim Repin's tone: flawlessly pure, with a warm glow in the low register, a celestial shimmer in the high one. But what makes it unique is its intense personal expressiveness, proving that there is no such thing as a "beautiful" tone unless it reflects the player's emotional response to the music. In this grand, expansive performance, Repin shows his lifelong love for the work in the way he caresses details, shapes phrases, and gives every note life and significance, even in the running passages . . . Repin and Chailly create a true collaboration of equals, each able to take either a leading or supporting role. The recorded balance, both between them and within the orchestra, is superb, bringing out and interweaving melodic strands in a seamless, colorful tapestry . . . [Double Concerto]: The playing . . . is not less impressive . . . After a majestic, austere beginning, the pervasive mood is expansive, mellow, nostalgic.

. . . one of the most beautiful recordings of the Brahms Violin Concerto ever made. First, there is Vadim Repin's tone: flawlessly pure, with a warm glow in the low register, a celestial shimmer in the high one. But what makes it unique is its intense personal expressiveness, proving that there is no such thing as a "beautiful" tone unless it reflects the player's emotional response to the music. In this grand, expansive performance, Repin shows his lifelong love for the work in the way he caresses details, shapes phrases, and gives every note life and significance, even in the running passages. Refuting the half-serious jest about the concerto being a battle between soloist and orchestra, Repin and Chailly create a true collaboration of equals, each able to take either a leading or supporting role. The recorded balance, both between them and within the orchestra, is superb, bringing out and interweaving melodic strands in a seamless, colorful tapestry. Repin also disproves the assertion that Brahms wrote the concerto against rather than for the violin, tossing off the most formidable technical feats as easily as throwing snowballs . . . [Double Concerto]: [the playing] is no less impressive . . . Intonation and ensemble are impeccable, the give-and-take and cumulative buildups work perfectly. Both players avoid false accents in the tricky finale opening. After a majestic, austere beginning, the pervasive mood is expansive, mellow, nostalgic.

. . . these performances are so great that they have to be mentioned. Repin proves to be an artist with mature insight in the Violin Concerto score. He has a particular feeling of breathing and phrasing which is simply unique . . . He and Truls Mork form a memorable duo . . . Riccardo Chailly makes the Gewandhaus orchestra play transparently and attentively. His sense of balance has matured throughout the years and the result is splendid.

Vadim Repins zweiter Streich bei der Deutsche Grammophon bestätigt den Eindruck des ersten -- und übrigens auch den Eindruck, den man sich im Konzert von ihm machen kann: Der Mann ist ein großer Geiger . . . Die Neueinspielung des Violinkonzerts an der Seite des Cellisten Truls Mørk ist frei vom Ehrgeiz aufzufallen, ist bar musikalischen Futterneids, restlos unaufgeblasen. Repin überdehnt oder staucht nicht, stellt nichts von hinten nach vorn oder von vorn an den Rand: Was er macht, ist triftig und angemessen, sein Spiel entwickelt sich ganz natürlich aus der Sache selbst und ist gleichwohl, bei aller Sorgfalt dem Werk gegenüber, alles andere als platt sachlich, vielmehr ausgesprochen persönlich. Die stille Innigkeit des Adagios ist geradezu atemberaubend, nahezu beispiellos, und in dieser Intensität erheblich Repins sinnlich erfahrbarer Authentizität und Glaubwürdigkeit geschuldet. Mit leichter Kraft behauptet er sich gegenüber dem von Chailly beweglich . . . dirigierten Gewandhausorchester, sein fokussierter Ton bewahrt volle Präsenz, auch wenn er sich weit ins Pianissimo zurückfallen lässt oder sich das Tutti breit vor ihn stellt. Die Begegnung mit Truls Mørk beim Doppelkonzert verläuft in bestem Einvernehmen . . . beide [spielen] ausgezeichnet ineinander . . . Chailly und die Leipziger halten tadellos Schritt mit den launischen Eskapaden der beiden Protagonisten . . .

Er spielt und spielt und spielt, stets auf höchstem Niveau . . . Denken wir nur an seinen Beethoven. Etwa die Kreutzer-Sonate, die er mit Martha Argerich, der Göttin des Klaviers, im Konzert gespielt und aufgenommen hat. Da sprühen die Funken, da wackelt die Welt, da strömt die Lava wollüstig aus dem Vulkan, und plötzlich steht alles still. Schnitt. Pause. Aus. Und Arkadien erscheint vor unserem inneren Auge. So in die Extreme getrieben, ist Repins Beethoven; man konnte das schon in der Interpretation des Violinkonzerts mit den Wiener Philharmonikern und Riccardo Muti hören. Ein Parforceritt durch die Seelenlandschaft des Komponisten ist diese Deutung. Repin geht dabei an die Ränder der Musik, an die Ränder des Existenziellen. Das Geschmeidige ist ihm fremd. Obschon: Repins Spiel klingt geschmeidig. Selbst noch im ruppigsten Moment. Ein Poet brüllt nicht . . . bei Repin klingt dieses Brahms-Konzert wie eine Mischung aus den späten Intermezzi für Klavier und der Zweiten Symphonie in D-Dur. Als ein Werk der sinnenden Tiefe und erkennenden Reife, darin die Leidenschaften aber hinter jedem Taktstrich aufscheinen. Und es klingt so wie das, was der legendäre Geiger Bronislav Huberman einst über das Konzert sagte: Es sei dies ein Stück, in dem die Violine gegen das Orchester antrete -- und am Ende gewinne . . .

. . . man [muss] seine Intensität bewundern. Truls Mørk ergänzt Repin im unterschätzten Doppelkonzert kongenial, sehr differenziert dokumentiert von der Tontechnik.

2009 hat erst ein Zwölftel hinter sich. Und doch kann man schwerlich den Gedanken loswerden, mit diesem Brahms-Album eine der schönsten Klassik-CDs des Jahres in Händen zu halten . . . [eine Aufnahme] für die einsame Insel . . .Das Werk ist beim Musizieren neu geboren. In diese Kategorie fällt für mich die eben erschienene Einspielung des Violinkonzertes von Johannes Brahms mit dem Sibirer Vadim Repin und Leipzigs Gewandhausorchester unter Riccardo Chailly . . . [Repin] erfüllt und erfühlt großartig die emotionalen Wechselbäder dieses Werks von pastoralen Stimmungen bis zur ungarischen Attacke. Sein Ton ist warm, aber nicht süß, in den virtuosen Passagen männlich-markant und doch ohne breitbeinigen Draufgänger-Appeal. Doch darf Repin mit Chailly eben auch auf einen äußerst stilbewussten Dirigenten bauen, der das Werk weit über die gebotene Zwiesprache hinaus versteht. Die ästhetische Einheit -- souverän gestützt von noblen Holzbläsern und einem wundergleichen Streicherteppich -- ist das Kapital dieser Aufnahme. Last not least findet sich in gleicher Besetzung plus Truls Mork Brahms' Doppelkonzert für Violine und Cello. Auch hier: Spannung von der ersten Minute. Aber nie Show, nie Effekthascherei. Die ersten Allegro-Takte: Puristisch, suggestiv, fast Bach-Hommage . . . sollte uns vor allem eines empfinden lassen: Glück.

State of the art, wie beim Komponisten, sollte es eben sein. Und dies ist dem nahezu Unfehlbaren aus Sibirien nun auch weitgehend gelungen . . . alle betrachteten offenbar ihren Brahms aus dem gleichen Blickwinkel: Harmonie und Virtuosität, eingebettet in eine gemessene, fürs hanseatische Brahms-Feeling passende Strenge, die stets den komplexen Aufbau des Konzertes und seine Spannungsbögen sorgsam herausarbeitet. Repin denkt hörbar sehr genau nach über die Musik -- so wird Brahms in dieser Konstellation eher diskutiert als zelebriert; was der unbändigen Wucht des Konzertes aber gut bekommt. Bei aller Süße und Klangsicherheit von Repins Geigenton gelingt die aufregende Reibung von norddeutscher Spröde und fast schon südländischer Melodienfülle des Konzertes. Die heitere Gelöstheit, die Brahms bei der Komposition in Pörtschach am Wörthersee wohl erfüllte, stellt Repin nicht naiv aus, er denkt sie mit und entwickelt aus diesem Spannungsfeld "seinen" Brahms . . . Repins Aufnahme hat das Zeug zum Klassiker.

Schon in seiner Aufnahme des Beethoven-Konzerts hat Vadim Repin gezeigt, dass er sich in die Reihe der "Großen" einfügen kann, und das gelingt ihm jetzt auch mit Brahms. Seine Interpretation . . . besitzt das überlegene musikalische und geigerische Format, das man von einem Künstler erwartet, der zur obersten Solistenkategorie gehört. Repin gestaltet weitsichtig und feinsinnig tonschön in jeder Lage, mit der Wahl der Heifetz-Kadenz im ersten Satz setzt er einen individuellen Akzent. In der Gesamtschau ist Repin auch bei Brahms der moderne Typ des "klassischen" Geigers, der die Tradition seiner berühmten Kollegen auf überzeugende Weise auf höchstem Niveau fortsetzt, mit einer Technik, die über jeden Zweifel erhaben ist, und einem Ausdruck, dem eine stimmige Musikalität innewohnt. Prinzipiell trifft dies alles auch auf die Interpretation des Doppelkonzerts zu. Repin hat mit dem Cellisten Truls Mørk einen hochrangigen Partner an seiner Seite, im kantablen zweiten Satz finden beide wie ein Instrument zusammen. Das Gewandhausorchester Leipzig ist unter der Leitung seines Chefdirigenten Riccardo Chailly ein sehr anpassungsfähiger und klanglich kultivierter Mitgestalter.

Schon in seiner Aufnahme des Beethoven-Konzerts hat Vadim Repin gezeigt, dass er sich in die Reihe der "Großen" einfügen kann, und das gelingt ihm jetzt auch mit Brahms. Seine Interpretation . . . besitzt das überlegene musikalische und geigerische Format, das man von einem Geiger erwartet, der zur obersten Solistenkategorie gehört. Repin gestaltet weitsichtig und feinsinnig tonschön in jeder Lage, mit der Wahl der Heifetz-Kadenz im ersten Satz setzt er einen individuellen Akzent. In der Gesamtschau ist Repin auch bei Brahms der moderne Typ des "klassischen" Geigers, der die Tradition seiner berühmten Kollegen auf höchstem Niveau fortsetzt, mit einer Technik, die über jeden Zweifel erhaben ist, und einem Ausdruck, dem eine stimmige Musikalität innewohnt. Prinzipiell trifft dies alles auch auf die Interpretation des Doppelkonzerts zu. Repin hat mit dem Cellisten Truls Mørk einen hochrangigen Partner an seiner Seite, im kantablen zweiten Satz finden beide wie ein Instrument zusammen. Das Gewandhausorchester Leipzig ist unter der Leitung seines Chefdirigenten Riccardo Chailly ein sehr anpassungsfähiger und klanglich kultivierter Mitgestalter.

Repin kostet den Brahms'schen Gefühlsreichtum aus, ohne sich zu überschwänglichen Gesten hinreißen zu lassen . . . Repin gestaltet die leisen Passagen leichthändig, sanft, und entfacht im abschließenden Allegro die Glut zum knisternden Feuer. Die Hälfte des Lorbeers gebührt freilich dem Leipziger Gewandhausorchester unter der Leitung von Riccardo Chailly . . . Als zweiter Solist tritt der Norweger Truls Mørk hinzu, der sich mit Repin wunderbar ergänzt . . . Gemeinsam mit den Leipzigern entfalten sie die ganze Dramatik in einem einzigen langen Bogen, der, ganz ohne Frage, die Seele rührt.

Tradition, neu gehört: Langsam und fern von solistischem Autismus suchen Repin, Mørk und Chailly nach Leidenschaft, die bleibt. Liebe glüht im Detail.

Mit einzigartig schönem und beseeltem Ton erzählt Repin . . . eine Art Geschichte: mal auftrumpfend, mal geheimnisvoll, mal träumerisch seinen Gedanken nachhängend, dann wieder voller Glut und Leidenschaft. Großartig auch das Doppelkonzert mit Truls Mørk am Cello.

Riccardo Chailly . . . bringt die Vorzüge der Leipziger Holzbläser . . . dirigiert einen klassisch gerundeten, klangintensiven Brahms. Und er hat einen Ausnahmecellisten zur Verfügung: So schön, so subtil und edel im Klang hört man den Cellopart Im Doppelkonzert selten . . .

Mit dem vorzüglich disponierten Gewandhausorchester Leipzig . . . zeichnet Riccardo Chailly das thematisch-motivische Geschehen mit hoher Transparenz und rhythmischer Prägnanz nach; und mit dem Solisten Vadim Repin weiss er sich in allen artikulatorischen und dynamischen Details so einig, dass der Eindruck einer glücklichen Symbiose entsteht . . . [Repin verfügt] über eine [grosse] tonliche Ausdruckspalette, die er in den lyrisch verinnerlichten Momenten mit ebenso grossem Gewinn ins Spiel bringt wie in den kraftvollen solistischen Aufschwüngen oder in der . . . Solokadenz von Heifetz. Und nicht zuletzt: im Verbund mit dem gleichgesinnten Cellisten Truls Mørk ergänzen Chailly und Repin ihre Aufnahme durch eine wunderbar eloquente und homogene Wiedergabe von Brahms' Doppelkonzert, das hier zu ähnlich eindringlicher Wirkung gelangt wie das ernstere dramatischere Violinkonzert.

Vadim Repin est tout simplement . . . "le plus grand violoniste vivant actuellement". Il est facile de souscrire à cette opinion devant la perfection technique et la pure beauté d'un archet déjà entré dans l'histoire de la musique. Repin, c'est aussi une humilité devant la musique et une modestie humaine irrésistible.

Autre démenti à toute velléité de se réfugier dans le passé : deux gravures récentes de concertos pour violon marquées du sceau de l'évidence. Vadim Repin enregistre le Concerto de Brahms (DG): non comme une statue de marbre, mais comme une confidence pleine de tendresse et de poésie, où le guarnerius de 1736 nous parle au creux de l'oreille, en parfaite complicité avec le Gewandhaus de Leipzig dirigé ­ par Riccardo Chailly, ainsi qu'avec le violoncelliste Truls Mörk dans le Double concerto.

Dès l'introduction, chef et orchestre annoncent la couleur du propos, majestueuse, et déroulent un tapis rouge au soliste. Grâce à une prise de son rapprochée, qui rappelle certains grands enregistrements de l'ère monophonique, son Guarneri des Gesu livre tout la richesse de ses timbres, violon onctueux, capable de sauvagerie comme de la plus grande tendresse. . . . Repin a fait le choix de doigtés qui privilégient les cordes graves, donnant à sa sonorité une chaleur particulière. Fasciné par la tendresse de la partition plus que par sa véhémence, il en propose une lecture centrée sur la poésie du chant et sur la complicité symphonique avec l'orchestre, plus que sur la bravoure instrumentale -- on a rarement entendu dialogue plus fusionnel entre chef et soliste. . . . C'est surtout la voix poignante de Menuhin qu'il nous rappelle dans le second mouvement, par ses élans du c¿ur comme par cette science intime qu'il a de faire parler le violon. Le finale est teinté d'un rhapsodisme fervent mais sans excès démonstratif, gardant en toutes circonstances un ton épique et noble. On retrouve cette hauteur de vue et cette dignité dans le "Double Concerto". Loin de tout rivalité narcissique, les deux solistes discourent avec une admirable cohérence. . . . Ils n'en traduisent . . . la véritable dimension symphonique de la partition, soutenus par un orchestre somptueux. . . . leur duo respire le naturel et la grandeur.

. . . une de plus magnifiques introduction orchestrales de la discographie. L'équilibre des pupitres du vénérable orchestre de Leipzig est mis au service d'un à-propos dynamique hors du commun: la pâte sonore brahmsienne est bien là, envoûtante . . . Une conception de la discipline musicale que Repin partage en tout point: pas un alanguissement, pas un seul abandon gratuit dans cette partition qui les sollicite pourtant, mais des couleurs à revendre et une ligne de conduite sans aucune hésitation. Les sensations procurées dans l'Adagio et le Finale font appel au vocabulaire oenologique: ossature, rondeur et tonicité à ce point liées révèlent ici le grand cru . . . [Double Concerto]: la rigueur, la probité et l'engagement de nos musiciens ont quelque chose d'un autre temps, où l'humilité et la discipline étaient l'hommage que l'on rendait à de tels chefs-d'oeuvre.

Repin se singularisait par une approche musicale et une sonorité plus félines, offrant en concert une alternative élégante et poétique au premier . . . le nouveau Repin vient à pic rappeler le merveilleux musicien qu¿il demeure. Il ne pouvait choisir meilleur orchestre que celui du Gewandhaus de Leipzig . . . pour enregistrer sa version de ce monument après l¿avoir rodé une vingtaine de fois en tournée sous la baguette de Riccardo Chailly . . . le chef italien offre au violoniste ce qui sonne comme le plus bel écrin de timbres de la discographie, conciliant majesté symphonique et dialogue chambriste. Encadré de l¿allegro introductif ample et fougueux et de celui conclusif dont Repin et Chailly exaltent, complices, la dimension "giocoso", l¿adagio central est, du point de vue orchestral, exemplaire. Sans minimiser l¿enivrante sonorité du hautbois de Henrik Wahlgren, force est de reconnaître qu¿on entend moins un solo pastoral accompagné qu¿un contrepoint de voix dont l¿équilibre et la respiration, sur ce tempo idéal, confinent au jeu d¿orgue . . . si l¿on y ajoute la souplesse, la vitalité et les mille tendres couleurs du violon de Repin, tout le prix de ce disque.

Cet impeccable technicien joue comme un dieu . . . l'attraction des contraires produit l'une des plus belles surprises dans ce répertoire. Ce Brahms est modelé, plastique, pudique, sans aucune lourdeur (grâce à une mise en évidence des sources néobaroques de certains passages) et si . . . tendre.