JAMES GALWAY Wings of Song

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JAMES GALWAY
Wings of Song

Werke von / Works by
J.S. Bach · Bellini · Brahms
J. Denver · Dvorák · Gluck · Fauré
Offenbach · Ravel · Rodrigo
Saint-Saëns · Satie · Schubert
Shore · Wagner
London Symphony Orchestra
Klauspeter Seibel
Int. Release 01 Sep. 2004
1 CD / Download
CD DDD 0289 477 5085 7 GH


トラック・リスト

Maurice Ravel (1875 - 1937)
Erik Satie (1866 - 1925)
James Galway, London Symphony Orchestra, Klauspeter Seibel

Franz Schubert (1797 - 1828)
James Galway, London Symphony Orchestra, Klauspeter Seibel, Moray Welsh

Anonymous
Joaquín Rodrigo (1901 - 1999)
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750)
Sonata For Violin And Harpsichord No.4 In C Minor, BWV 1017

Camille Saint-Saëns (1835 - 1921)
Samson et Dalila

Arranged by Craig Leon

Act 2

Vincenzo Bellini (1801 - 1835)
Norma

Gabriel Fauré (1845 - 1924)
Requiem, Op.48

James Galway, London Symphony Orchestra, Klauspeter Seibel

Jacques Offenbach (1819 - 1880)
Les Contes d'Hoffmann

Arranged by Craig Leon

Act 2

James Galway, Lady Jeanne Galway, London Symphony Orchestra, Klauspeter Seibel

Richard Wagner (1813 - 1883)
Wesendonck Lieder

Christoph Willibald von Gluck (1714 - 1787)
Orfeo ed Euridice (Orphée et Eurydice), Wq. 30

Arranged by Craig Leon

Act 3

James Galway, London Symphony Orchestra, Klauspeter Seibel

Antonín Dvorák (1841 - 1904)
String Quartet No.12 In F Major, Op.96 - "American" B.179

James Galway, London Symphony Orchestra, Klauspeter Seibel, Moray Welsh

Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897)
Fünf Lieder op.49

Howard Shore
John Denver (1943 - 1997)
James Galway, London Symphony Orchestra, Klauspeter Seibel

再生時間合計 1:13:32

Sir James Galway is in line for a new classical crossover success with the September 13 release of "Wings of Song" . . . Galway, once marketed as "the man with the golden flute", has the potential to reach a large audience . . .

I remember first hearing him in Karajan's Berlin Phil and being bowled over by his ravishing sound and fabulously pure intonation . . . It's wonderful to hear Galway still playing with such control and luminescent tone . . . 73 minutes of slow, dreamy music.

The pearly, ultra-smooth sound of Galway's flute certainly conveys the lovliness of these arias.

Wenn es einer verstanden hat, höchste Meisterschaft auf dem Instrument und vorbehaltlose Akzeptanz im Klassik-Olymp ganz unverkrampft mit Entertainer-Qualitäten zu verbinden, dann James Galway.

Sir James Galway es uno de los mejores flautistas de la actualidad, y uno de los pocos cuyo nombre es un reclamo inmediato para los melómanos. ... Galway sabe sobreponerse a la fuerza de la obra original, realzando, con respeto, aquellos aspectos más minúsculos y desapercibidos de ésta, hasta no dejar un solo acorde de la partitura sin mostrar en toda su plenitud.
JAMES GALWAY: The world's greatest flautist signs with Deutsche Grammophon

Sir James Galway, widely acknowledged as the greatest living flute player, has signed an exclusive recording contract with Deutsche Grammophon.

“You know, I'm really happy to be working with Deutsche Grammophon," says the silver-tongued Irishman, "because I feel that, at last, I am coming home to my roots."

Internationally regarded as both a matchless interpreter of the classical repertoire and a consummate entertainer whose charismatic appeal crosses all musical boundaries, Galway's unique sound, superb musicianship, and dazzling virtuosity have made him one of the most respected and sought-after performing artists of our time.

After early stints with the Sadlers Wells Opera, Royal Opera Covent Garden, BBC Symphony Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra and Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (principal flute), he tired of English orchestral life and, in 1967, moved to Switzerland (he still lives there, in a village overlooking Lake Lucerne with his wife, American-born flute player Jeanne Cinnante).

Two years later, James Galway was appointed principal flute with the Berliner Philharmoniker. For the six years he was Karajan's first flute, Galway played on the majority of his Berliner Philharmoniker recordings.

“You see, my real musical roots are in Germany," admits Sir James. “To join this wonderful orchestra, with great musicians and a very famous conductor, for me it was heaven. I think the best time I had in my life was with Herbert von Karajan and DG. I feel I'm “back in", if you like. I'm really pleased about it - it's inspired me to practise a lot more than I usually do!"

In 1975 he left Berlin to go freelance and, with the help of best-selling discs and frequent television appearances, quickly became a household name, a name that is now synonymous with his instrument. In 1978 he was awarded the OBE (Order of the British Empire). By the 1980s he was playing over 200 concerts a year.

To date, in addition to those with the Berliner Philharmoniker, he has made nearly 60 recordings as a solo artist, ranging from the Mozart Flute Quartets, The Essential Flute of James Galway (no.1 in the classical charts) and new concertos by Lowell Liebermann, to James Galway at the Movies, Legends (which spent a total of 29 weeks in the top five of Billboard's World Music Chart), and Winter's Crossing (both with award-winning Irish recording artist Phil Coulter), a piece narrated by Oscar-nominated actor Liam Neeson; this evocative blend of Celtic melodies and original composition was inspired by the bravery of the Irish immigrants who first sailed to America. In celebration of St. Patrick's Day 1999, Mr. Galway and Mr. Coulter again joined forces in an evening of music and spoken word celebrating the people of Northern Ireland, entitled Both Sides Now. This benefit performance, to help the victims of violence in Northern Ireland, was held at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York and the same programme was later performed at the White House. “I Will Always Love You", written for Galway by Sir Elton John, was awarded a Grammy.

Galway's best-selling albums include Annie's Song (1978), In the Pink with Henry Mancini (1984), James Galway and the Chieftains in Ireland (1987), Wind Beneath My Wings (1991) and Mozart's Flute and Harp Concerto (1993).

He is understandably proud of what he has contributed to the literature of the instrument. “I have commissioned some of the greatest flute concertos of the late 20th century. Listen to the Liebermann and you'll hear what I mean," he urges. He could also add works by Corigliano, Arnold, Rodrigo, Bolcom, the British composer David Heath and a host of others.

Galway currently owns three platinum flutes, fifteen gold and two silver. “Someone gave me a silver one the other day," he enthuses. “It's beautiful, about 120 years old. Most instruments of this age have been wrecked, but this has survived." His chief flute-maker is Muramatsu of Japan.

Born in 1939 in Belfast, Galway first learned the violin before turning to the penny-whistle, an instrument on which he is still a virtuoso! An early inspiration were the recordings of the New Zealand-born John Amadio (1884-1964). “He was the first person I ever heard play the flute on a record. He was technically mind-boggling. On one disc he plays chromatic scales as though he's running one finger down the flute. He set the standard for me as a child."

Having left school at 14, his first job was as a piano tuner's apprentice. Then he won a scholarship to the Royal College of Music in London. He continued his studies at the Guildhall School of Music where the greatest influences on him were William Bennett and Geoffrey Gilbert (formerly Sir Thomas Beecham's flautist and, says Galway, “then one of the greatest living teachers of the flute"). Later he went to the Paris Conservatoire. While with the London Symphony Orchestra, Galway also took private lessons from the legendary French flautist Marcel Moyse (1889-1984).

In 1998, he was made Principal Guest Conductor of the London Mozart Players and, the following year, was named Musician of the Year by Musical America. From the outset of his career, James Galway has dazzled young and old with his virtuosity and his engaging personality, through appearances on such US television programmes as the Tonight Show, the Today Show, Good Morning America, CBS This Morning, Live with Regis and Kathie Lee, Sesame Street, and PBS's Live from Lincoln Center, and as host of his own holiday specials.

On 4 July 2000, Galway helped celebrate the first Independence Day of the new century as a guest soloist with the National Symphony Orchestra of Washington DC in a nationally televised PBS special entitled “A Capitol Fourth", broadcast live from the West Lawn of the Capitol. He performs on several tracks from the soundtrack of Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King in a score composed and conducted by Academy Award-winner Howard Shore.

In June 2001 Mr. Galway received the honour of knighthood from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

In this, his 65th birthday year, Deutsche Grammophon is proud to welcome backSir James Galway. To have him back once more on the Yellow Label - this time as a world famous soloist - is both a privilege and a pleasure.
Jeremy Nicholas
6/2004

Back home on Deutsche Grammophon

Sir James Galway - “The Man with the Golden Flute" - is internationally regarded as both a matchless interpreter of the classical repertoire and a consummate entertainer. With his unique sound, superb musicianship and dazzling virtuosity, he has a charismatic appeal which crosses all musical boundaries and has made him one of the most respected and sought-after performing artists of our time.

Galway began his career with the Royal Shakespeare Theatre's wind band at Stratford-upon-Avon before stints in the orchestras of the Sadler's Wells Opera Company and the Royal Opera House, as well as the BBC Symphony Orchestra. He was then appointed principal flautist of the London Symphony Orchestra and subsequently of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. In 1969, tiring of English orchestral life, James Galway was appointed principal flute of the Berlin Philharmonic. For the six years he was Karajan's first flute, Galway played on most of his recordings with the orchestra. “You see, my real musical roots are in Germany," admits Sir James. “To join this wonderful orchestra, some great musicians and a very famous conductor, for me it was heaven. I think the best time I had in my life was with Herbert von Karajan and DG. I feel I'm 'back in', if you like. I'm really pleased about it - it's inspired me to practise a lot more than I usually do!" In 1975 he moved to Switzerland. He still lives there, in a village overlooking Lake Lucerne with his wife, American-born flautist Jeanne.

Galway's first recording for DG since those days features a world premiere: the first recording of The Lord of the Rings Suite by the Canadian film composer Howard Shore. It uses themes from the music heard in his Academy-Award winning scores for the hugely popular Hobbit trilogy. For the rest of the programme, Sir James has chosen a characteristic mix of classical and popular works. Among these is the lovely duet “Belle nuit, ô nuit d'amour", better known as the Barcarolle from Offenbach's opera The Tales of Hoffmann. It makes a perfect vehicle for two flutes and also, in this case, a husband and wife: James and Jeanne Galway.

“En Aranjuez con tu amor" is the title given to the beautiful arrangement of the second movement of Joaquín Rodrigo's ever-popular Concierto de Aranjuez, the finest guitar concerto of the 20th century. Composed in 1939, the work was named for the princely town of Aranjuez with its magnificent palace, just outside Madrid. There's also a new version of the piece that has virtually become Galway's signature tune - Annie's Song by John Denver - as well as haunting perfor-mances of Schubert's Ave Maria, Brahms's Wiegenlied, Ravel's Pavane pour une Infante défunte (originally written for piano in 1899 and heard here in an arrangement by Craig Leon), Satie's Gymnopédie no.3 and other selections. Whatever their musical origins, be it opera, lieder, piano or guitar, all the works in this collection give the impression of having been penned with the flute in the back of their composers' minds.

After leaving Berlin in 1975, Galway went freelance and, with the help of best-selling discs and frequent television appearances, quickly became a household name, a name that is now synonymous with his instrument. By the 1980s he was playing over 200 concerts a year. He is understandably proud of what he has contributed to the literature of the instrument: “I have commissioned some of the greatest flute concertos of the late twentieth century. Listen to the Liebermann and you'll see what I mean," he urges. He could also add works by Corigliano, Arnold, Rodrigo, Bolcom, the British composer David Heath and a host of others.

Born in 1939 in Belfast, Galway learned to play the tin whistle as a boy. He recalls those days here in the wistful traditional Irish folk tune The Dawning of the Day, played on the first instrument he mastered as a youngster and on which he is still a virtuoso! An early inspiration was the recordings of the New Zealand-born John Amadio (1884-1964). “He was the first person I ever heard play the flute on a record. He was technically mind-boggling. On one disc he plays chromatic scales as though he's running one finger down the flute. He set the standard for me as a child."

Having left school at 14, his first job was as a piano tuner's apprentice. Then he won a scholarship to the Royal College of Music in London. He continued his studies at the Guildhall School of Music where the greatest influences on him were William Bennett and Geoffrey Gilbert (formerly Sir Thomas Beecham's principal flautist and, says Galway, “then one of the greatest living teachers of the flute"). Later he went to the Paris Conservatoire. While with the London Symphony Orchestra, Galway also took private lessons from the legendary French flautist Marcel Moyse (1889-1984).

In 1998, he was made Principal Guest Conductor of the London Mozart Players and, the following year, was named Musician of the Year by Musical America. On the Fourth of July 2000, Galway helped celebrate the first Independence Day of the new century as a guest soloist with the National Symphony Orchestra of Washington DC, in a nationally televised PBS special entitled “A Capitol Fourth", broadcast live from the West Lawn of the Capitol. He performs on several tracks of the soundtrack for The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King in a score composed and conducted by the Oscar-winning Howard Shore.

Galway currently owns three platinum flutes, fifteen gold and two silver. “Someone gave me a silver one the other day," he enthuses. “It's beautiful, about 120 years old. Most instruments of this age have been wrecked, but this has survived." His main flute maker is Muramatsu of Japan. In 1978 Galway was awarded the OBE (Order of the British Empire); in June 2001 he received the honour of knighthood from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. To have Sir James back now on the Yellow Label - this time as a world-famous soloist - is both a privilege and a pleasure.

Jeremy Nicholas