BEETHOVEN Die 10 Violinsonaten Kremer

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LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Die 10 Violinsonaten
The 10 Violin Sonatas
Gidon Kremer
Martha Argerich
Int. Release 01 Sep. 1995
3 CDs / Download
CD DDD 0289 447 0582 9 GH 3


Track List

CD 1: Beethoven: Sonatas Nos.1, 2, 3 & 5 "Spring"

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827)
Sonata for Violin and Piano No.1 in D, Op.12 No.1

Sonata for Violin and Piano No.2 in A, Op.12 No.2

Sonata for Violin and Piano No.3 in E flat, Op.12 No.3

Sonata for Violin and Piano No.5 in F, Op.24 - "Spring"

Gidon Kremer, Martha Argerich

Total Playing Time 1:17:22

CD 2: Beethoven: Sonatas Nos.6, 7 & 10

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827)
Sonata for Violin and Piano No.10 in G, Op.96

Sonata for Violin and Piano No.6 in A, Op.30 No.1

Sonata for Violin and Piano No.7 in C minor, Op.30 No.2

Gidon Kremer, Martha Argerich

Total Playing Time 1:13:30

CD 3: Beethoven: Sonatas Nos.4, 8 & 9 "Kreutzer"

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827)
Sonata for Violin and Piano No.8 in G, Op.30 No.3

Sonata for Violin and Piano No.4 in A minor, Op.23

Sonata for Violin and Piano No.9 in A, Op.47 - "Kreutzer"

Gidon Kremer, Martha Argerich

Total Playing Time 1:15:37

Kremer and Argerich understand the bright buoyancy of the Op. 12 triptych, in which the music flows along crisply yet flexibly, with brisk tempos and sharply defined dynamics: there is charm here as well as the necessary energy. I confess to longstanding slight reservations about this violinist's sweet yet wiry tone and the way he sometimes shapes and shades a phrase; but make no mistake, he is totally assured and his partnership with the equally authoritative Argerich offers much to admire and enjoy. The finale of the First Sonata, a dancing rondo in 6/8, shows their boldness and bounce to advantage - and the same is true of the witty first movement of No. 2, in the same metre but more teasing in character. Slow movements, sometimes in variation form, also characteristically speak with elegance and eloquence while scherzos have point and vitality. This latter characteristic also marks the Presto first movement of the A minor Sonata, No. 4, unusually vigorous here, with Argerich in tigerish mood. Though this duo mostly know when to persuade and relax, with such strong players the interpretative temperature is inevitably on the high side.