BERLIOZ Roméo et Juliette Monteux

HECTOR BERLIOZ

Roméo et Juliette
Romeo und Julia

Symphonie fantastique*
Resnik · Turp · Ward
London Symphony Chorus
London Symphony Orchestra
Pierre Monteux
Orchester der Wiener Staatsoper *
Rene Leibowitz *
Int. Release 01 Nov. 2001
Download
ADD 0289 471 2422 1 GWM 2
Westminster


Track List

CD 1: Berlioz: Roméo & Juliette

Hector Berlioz (1803 - 1869)
Roméo et Juliette, Op.17, H.79

Part 1

London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux

Regina Resnik, London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux, London Symphony Chorus

André Turp, London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux, London Symphony Chorus

Part 2

London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux

Part 3

London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux, London Symphony Chorus

Part 4

London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux

Part 5

London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux, London Symphony Chorus

Part 6

London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux

Total Playing Time 1:16:02

CD 2: Berlioz: Roméo & Juliette; Symphonie fantastique

Hector Berlioz (1803 - 1869)
Roméo et Juliette, Op.17, H.79

Part 7

London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux, London Symphony Chorus

David Ward, London Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Monteux, London Symphony Chorus

Symphonie fantastique, Op.14, H.48

Orchester der Wiener Staatsoper, René Leibowitz

Total Playing Time 1:13:03

. . . [an] extraordinary sound . . . Every instrument comes through with great clarity, in balance with the others. There's a minimum of hiss and a real sense of space around the music . . . [the lyrical sections, especially the "Scène aux champs",] emerges as one of the most satisfying I have ever heard: highly atmospheric and convincing . . . overall this is a superb account . . . As for the Shakespearian fantasy, the LSO under Monteux plays absolutely beautifully, yet even they are upstaged by the verve and attack of the chorus, who sing in excellent French and sound as if they are relishing every moment of their contribution. The climactic chorus is terrifically rousing . . . [Pierre Monteux] evinces no sign of waning powers: the ecstasy of the love music and the drama of the tomb scene both emerge triumphant, and the frequent quicksilver episodes are never lethargic. His three soloists are excellent . . . André Turp is light, fleet and a genuinely idiomatic Gallic tenor. Best of all is smooth, sonorous, authoritative, Scottish bass David Ward's Père Laurence, reminding us what a fine artist he was.