MASSENET Werther / Villazón, Koch, Pappano

Share

JULES MASSENET

Werther
Rolando Villazón · Sophie Koch
Audun Iversen · Eri Nakamura
Orchestra of the Royal Opera House
Antonio Pappano
Int. Release 17 Feb. 2012
2 CDs / Download
0289 477 9340 3 2 CDs DDD GH2
"Villazón was nothing short of magnificent...the raw emotion in his singing was quite wondrous..."

Express.co.uk



Track List

CD 1: Massenet: Werther

Jules Massenet (1842 - 1912)
Werther

Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Act 1

Alain Vernhes, Jack Sullivan, Valerie Zakharov, Pierce Adams, Kitty Woods, Harry Oakes, Nico Taylor, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Darren Jeffery, Stuart Patterson, Jack Sullivan, Valerie Zakharov, Pierce Adams, Kitty Woods, Harry Oakes, Nico Taylor, Alain Vernhes, Eri Nakamura, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Jack Sullivan, Valerie Zakharov, Pierce Adams, Kitty Woods, Harry Oakes, Nico Taylor, Rolando Villazón, Sophie Koch, Alain Vernhes, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Alain Vernhes, Zhengzhong Zhou, Anna Devin, Sophie Koch, Rolando Villazón, Eri Nakamura, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Audun Iversen, Eri Nakamura, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Audun Iversen, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Sophie Koch, Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Rolando Villazón, Sophie Koch, Antonio Pappano, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden

Rolando Villazón, Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Alain Vernhes, Sophie Koch, Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Act 2

Darren Jeffery, Stuart Patterson, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Audun Iversen, Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Stuart Patterson, Darren Jeffery, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Audun Iversen, Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Eri Nakamura, Rolando Villazón, Audun Iversen, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Rolando Villazón, Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Sophie Koch, Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Eri Nakamura, Rolando Villazón, Sophie Koch, Audun Iversen, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Total Playing Time 1:14:48

CD 2: Massenet: Werther

Jules Massenet (1842 - 1912)
Werther

Act 3

Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Eri Nakamura, Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Eri Nakamura, Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Rolando Villazón, Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Sophie Koch, Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Audun Iversen, Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Act 4

13.
0:00
4:23

Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Rolando Villazón, Sophie Koch, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Jack Sullivan, Valerie Zakharov, Pierce Adams, Kitty Woods, Harry Oakes, Nico Taylor, Sophie Koch, Rolando Villazón, Eri Nakamura, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Sophie Koch, Rolando Villazón, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Antonio Pappano

Total Playing Time 57:27

Rolando Villazón dies spectacularly well, navigating the arc from infatuation to despair to determination. Sophie Koch excels as the remorseful Charlotte reading Werther's letters . . . Not a dry eye in the house.

. . . impassioned orchestral playing . . . heartfelt conducting . . . Pappano keeps authoritative control over the temperature gauge throughout and never lets the emotions boil over into abject melodrama . . . [Rolando Villazón]: The showpiece aria "Pourquoi me réveiller" is shaped with a rare sensitivity, and in the last act his singing is coloured by a desperate sincerity which would melt the hardest heart . . . [Sophie Koch] sustains a firm clear line through the character's more hysterical outbursts in the third act. Eri Nakamura contributes a sweet and cheerful Sophie . . . The recording is warm and vivid . . .

. . . [his performance here is] impassioned, poetic, both thrillingly extrovert and poignantly introverted . . . his dark lyric tenor is [beautiful] . . .

. . . [there are numerous times] when subtlety and beauty of his vocal effects take the breath away: the dazzling light and rapid fade, for instance, during the syllables of the word "lumičre" [in act one] . . . Sophie Koch puts her best tonsils forward singing the agonized Charlotte of act three, while Eri Nakamura is suitably bubbly [as Sophie] . . . Villazón's ardour finds its match in Antonio Pappano's conducting. He never shrinks from the luscious ache in Massenet's music or its dramatic bustle. Nocturnal sighs; bucolic whooping; dark melodramatics: the Royal Opera House orchestra takes care of them all.

Singers, musicians and maestro all shine . . . [on Rolando Villazón]: this is a richly nuanced pertormance the voice free and flexible . . . Villazón pulls out all the stops in a highly passionate interpretation French mezzo Sophie Koch brings a simplicity and vulnerability to Charlotte; her "Val laisse couler mes larmes" is particularly touching. Eri Nakamura makes a charming Sophie with clear, sweet tone and a real sense of "joie de vivre", while Audun Iversen is perfectly acceptable in the underwritten role of Albert. Antonio Pappano brings a Wagnerian intensity to the darker moments of the score while offering an emotionally vital reading with some satisfying string solos from the ROH orchestra. Recommended.

. . . [a] fine performance . . . [Rolando Villazón] is in intensely lyrical form as the brooding poet smitten with the married Charlotte, sung with passionate elegance by mezzo-soprano Sophie Koch. Antonio Pappano leads the excellent orchestra of the Royal Opera House in a detailed and ardent account of the score.

. . . [Villazón] successfully negotiates the exposed or awkward passages . . . an appreciable achievement . . . [Sophie Koch's] more restrained passion is beautifully suggested in her French-song-like approach, but she too opens up in Act II while remaining within the stylistic spirit of writing that externalizes inner tensions with considerable subtlety. Audun Iversen perfectly conveys Charlotte's husband . . . Eri Nakamura delivers Charlotte's more vivacious sister Sophie with neatness and point . . . Drawing the very best from his Royal Opera House musicians . . . [Antonio Pappano] hones in perceptively on harmonic and orchestral detail, revealing the score's stresses and strains while deftly conveying its momentum.

. . . Villazón is now on top of his game . . . Villazón holds nothing back . . . his voice and passion ring out unfettered . . . Under Antonio Pappano's poetic baton, Villazón and mezzo-soprano Sophie Koch pull out all the stops, singing with passion and fervor . . .

The immediate attraction of Villazón's voice and its application to the music he sings is the quality of the sound (a mixture of sweetness and tears) and the way he puts the communication of feeling first . . . He relies on the emotional, visceral quality of his tone to transmit the meaning of melody and text . . . The "Désolation" in Act Two finds him thrilling in his despair . . . he rounds off a thoughtful interpretation of a long and taxing role in a concentrated "death scene" which maintains the standard . . . [Sophie Koch]: the dark tragic overtones of the now-mature voice an ideal starting-point for an agonised interpretation. The implied threat of the words in Werther's last letter, "tu frémiras", is chilling . . . [The supporting cast] is admirable . . . Audun Iversen's soft-grained baritone is smart casting for Albert . . . [Antonio Pappano]: Certainly the Music Director of the Royal Opera House shares a clear conception of the hero's emotional narrative and supports the tenor with finely-balanced orchestral sound at the climaxes. He makes a strong case for [this work] . . . From Pappano the score feels like a genuine tragedy.

. . . [Villazón throws] every fibre of his being into an intense portrayal of Werther . . . [every ounce] is employed fearlessly to fire up the inferno in Werther's tortured soul . . . it is impressive to hear so much soft singing live in the opera house and how conscientiously he shapes long phrases . . . Villazón's Werther is alive at every moment in the mind's eye . . . Sophie Koch's Charlotte rises to the big moments generously enough -- and it is a pleasure to hear a native French speaker in the role . . . Aside from Villazón, the strongest personality in the cast is Antonio Pappano, who gets detailed playing from the orchestra . . . his sense of drama is second to none, rising to white heat at the climax . . . this live recording adds a distinctive voice of its own.

. . . a high-adrenaline "Werther" . . . a daunting range of expression and color . . . Villazón is firm and vibrant in this spinto workout . . . he is a paragon of artistic, flexible singing, tightly in sync with the conductor. The tenor achieves a convincing portrait of a Werther riddled with fatal sensitivity and then finally at peace. The supporting cast provides good contrast to the dark theatrics of the two protagonists . . . alert, richly colored playing of the Royal Opera House Orchestra.

. . . a blazing performance by Rolando Villazón in the title role. His handling of the famous aria "Pourquoi Me Réveiller" is quite superb, with a passionate power.

. . . a thoroughly convincing portrayal of Werther . . . The voice, firm and
ardent . . . is wielded with Villazón's characteristic confidence . . . high notes produced freely and without noticeable strain. Moreover, his identification with the tragically unhappy, emotionally volatile lover is thorough. He spins out long-spanned melodies with shape and nuance yet also gives spontaneous vent to Werther's expressions of hopes and despair. His fine "Pourquoi me réveiller" displays these virtues in microcosm . . . Villazón is ideally paired with the voluptuously-voiced Charlotte of Sophie Koch, who is especially stunning when letting the voice out full-throttle . . . The clear-voiced Eri Nakamura sings sparklingly as Charlotte's cheery sister Sophie but also makes something of the character's fleeting serious moments. Audun Iversen offers a handsomely-sung . . . Albert, though his cry of Charlotte, when he orders her to fetch his pistol box, is chilling . . . Clinching the set's claim as one of the best of modern "Werthers" is Antonio Pappano's excellent conducting, which, like Villazón's performance, serves with equal distinction the score's poetic elements and its hot-tempered fervour.

Sophie Koch (Charlotte), Audun Iversen (Albert) and Eri Nakamura (Sophie) are all well cast, . . . the linchpin is Villazon . . . [who] is far more dramatically focused. . . he doesn't even need the usual romantic pathos, so specifically does he reveal his character's terrifying psychology. Has any other tenor on record so completely inhabited this role?

Diese Aufnahme lässt keinen Hörer kalt . . . Große Gefühle und ungezügelte Leidenschaft sind die Essenz [dieser neuen Aufnahme] . . . [Rolando Villazón] agiert in dieser höchst anspruchsvollen Partie souverän, begeistert mit maximalem Einsatz und besitzt nach wie vor das Charisma, das einen Star ausmacht . . . Nichts wirkt in seiner Interpration künstlich, man leidet vielmehr mit ihm mit . . . Villazón legt in die Töne Schmerz und Emotionen, er schont sich in keiner Sekunde, nimmt sich aber auch Zeit für die sanften, schwärmerischen Momente. Mit voller Energie meistert er die hohe Lage, seine Spitzentöne haben Glanz und Ausdruck . . . Der Tenor harmoniert bestens mit dem prächtigen Spiel des Orchesters des Royal Opera House, das mit voller Attacke und rhythmischer Zuspitzung emotional aufbrausend agiert. Antonio Pappano hat hier das perfekte "Instrument", um Werthers existenzielles Drama nachzuzeichnen; die Solisten (Cello, Violine) gefallen mit erlesener Klangkultur . . . [ein] packender Finalakt . . . [man spürt] bei dieser so temperamentvollen Interpretation förmlich die Bühnenspannung . . .

. . . [man kann] sich dieser eindringlichen Interpretation nicht entziehen . . . [Rolando Villazón liegt] perfekt auf der Linie von Antonio Pappano . . . Der Italiener liebt die dramatische Attitüde und lässt sein prächtig aufspielendes Orchester immer wieder zu markanten Aufschwüngen hochfahren.

. . . [Villazóns] Portrait des Werther berührt -- als starke Studie eines zerrissenen Charakters. Neben Sophie Kochs stimmschöner Charlotte dreht das Orchester unter Antonio Pappano mächtig auf: mit ungebremster Ekstase und voller Klangpracht.

Der nach wie vor mit berückendem Timbre überwältigende Tenor singt und schluchzt sich hier durch seine Paraderolle des leidenden Lovers und geizt dabei nicht mit vokalen Gefühlsausbrüchen. Als absolut ebenbürtig an seiner Seite erweist sich auf dieser Gesamteinspielung unter der Leitung von Antonio Pappano die Mezzosopranistin Sophie Koch als samt-stimmige Charlotte.

Er gestaltet diese zerrissene Person mit einer atemberaubenden Vielfältigkeit und Überzeugungskraft. Ob laute Verzweiflung oder stilles Leide und Trauern, nichts wirkt aufgesetzt, die Stimme ist immer intelligent geführt und kontrolliert eingesetzt. Hinzu kommt eine hervorragende Intonation und deutliche Aussprache . . . [Sophie Koch gestaltet] mit großer Innigkeit und Authentizität . . . [Eri Nakamura]: eine großartige Leistung! Audun Iversen als Albert bringt die Nuancen seiner Partie mit angenehm timbrierter Stimme zum Ausdruck . . . Antonio Pappano führt das Orchester des Königlichen Opernhauses Covent Garden mit ausgezeichnetem Gespür. Die Sänger werden intelligent begleitet, nie aber drängt sich der Orchesterklang in den Vordergrund. Die hervorragende Einspielung wird ergänzt durch ein gut gestaltetes Booklet mit dem vollständigen Libretto und interessanten Kommentaren über die Oper.

. . . Rolando Villazón heiß ersehnt auf CD zurück: . . . in guter Form sein berauschendes Selbst, das Herz samt Träne auf der Zunge und in jeder Regung glaubhaft. Herz-Schmerz total, von Covent-Garden-Pultchef Antonio Pappano atmosphärisch dicht und packend aufbereitet.

. . . concernant Pappano, prenez le début du cd2, tout le prélude et l'air des lettres de Charlotte (début du III) respire, palpite, tressaille au diapason d'une âme amoureuse possédée par une passion muette et tue; c'est un Massenet puccinien vertigineux et intérieur : l'orchestre est magnifique, et la direction, d'un engagement exceptionnel . . . le ténor franco-mexicain, Rolando Villazón: superbe surprise en vérité . . . [Les moyens sont] intacts et déjŕ délectables: interprčte magistral de bout en bout, Rolando maîtrise la voix sur l'étendue de la tessiture, avec des aigus rayonnants et colorés, un style ŕ l'opposé de sa partenaire, véritable modčle de chant puissant et intelligent: proche du texte, flexible, naturel, nuancé; capable de mezza-voce soutenue, sur le souffle, et ce qu'il partage aujourd'hui avec Roberto Alagna, cet investissement radical sur le plan émotionnel et psychologique, ciselé avec une subtilité . . . sans pathos: "Pourquoi me réveiller . . . " est en ce sens littéralement bouleversant : c'est le chant d'un condamné qui a déjŕ choisi de mourir . . . le tenorissimo réussit son retour lyrique . . . Bravissimo Rolando!

Peu d'interprčtes ont su traduire avec autant de ferveur l'intensité aussi bien vocale que psychologique du rôle. Il fallait immortaliser au disque cette incarnation habitée, hantée, hallucinée. La voici dans la luxueuse production du Covent Garden de Londres (mai 2011), qui a marqué le retour triomphal de Villazón . . . Sophie Koch lui donne une réplique passionnée; Antonio Pappano dirige avec une volupté qui n'exclut pas la clarté. Un must.

. . . [Sophie Koch]: une fort belle Charlotte, d'une extręme noblesse d'accents lorsqu'elle défend les valeurs familiales et tient le discours du devoir, mais qui peut aussi se faire mutine lorsqu'elle parle pour la premičre fois ŕ Werther, et qui trahit toute sa passion dans les deux derniers actes. L'air des Lettres et celui des Larmes sont deux grands moments de son incarnation, ici soutenue par une direction infiniment plus allante que celle de Michel Plasson. Antonio Pappano est l'autre point fort de cet enregistrement . . . Les enfants ont été bien choisis . . . ce Werther pourra apparaître comme une alternative aux versions plus anciennes.

Insights

Werther at Covent Garden

Werther is a work of Massenet’s maturity, premiered in February 1892, just three months before his 50th birthday. By then he was a highly experienced and successful composer, with a sequence of acclaimed operas – Le Roi de Lahore, Hérodiade, Manon, Le Cid, Esclarmonde – to his credit, several of which enjoyed international fame. But the origins of Werther go back quite some way. Paul Milliet, one of the three librettists responsible for the skilful operatic adaptation of Goethe’s novel, described how the idea came up in February 1882 while he was travelling to Milan with Massenet and Georges Hartmann, the composer’s publisher and occasional librettist, to attend the first Italian performances of Hérodiade at La Scala. At the end of a conversation about Goethe’s novel and its operatic possibilities, it was agreed that Milliet should write a libretto for Massenet. He subsequently set to work, in consultation with Hartmann, spending several years on the task, while the composer kept busy with other projects.

Massenet himself, in Mes Souvenirs (published in 1912, the year of his death), described how on a visit with Hartmann to Bayreuth in 1886 to hear Parsifal, the two then travelled to Wetzlar, the setting of Goethe’s partly autobiographical story. After they had looked around the house where the original Charlotte had lived, Hartmann presented the composer with a translation of the book. In fact, Massenet, who meticulously dated his manuscripts, seems already to have begun writing Werther in the summer of 1885. He completed the vocal score on 14 March 1887, and was occupied with its orchestration until 2 July.

Werther was initially turned down by Léon Carvalho, director of the Opéra-Comique, as being too dismal. Massenet then sat on the score for five years, awaiting more auspicious circumstances in which to unveil it. These finally presented themselves in the shape of a request for a new work from Wilhelm Jahn, director of the Vienna Court Opera, where Manon had notched up more than 100 performances.

Composition of the score began earlier than these dates suggest, as soon as Massenet had some sort of text to work on. His regular practice with any libretto would be to memorize it, then to compose it in his head, usually while out walking, and then only when he was satisfied to put it down on paper. This is partly what gives his immaculate word-setting both its precision and its spontaneity. Few composers have ever set the French language with such a sensitive feeling for its natural inflections and expressive possibilities.

Massenet’s technical sophistication and flexibility are also demonstrated throughout the score by its fluidity of texture and structure. As a work conceived for the Opéra-Comique, Werther was heir to a long tradition that included spoken dialogue linking the musical numbers, as in Bizet’s Carmen (1875). Massenet’s own Manon (1884) retained the use of mélodrame – spoken text over an orchestral accompaniment – but Werther is through-composed, with no spoken text at all; and though it remains essentially a “number opera”, with the characters moving into set pieces at emotional high-points, the joins between these “numbers” and the linking material are so well disguised that the listener is scarcely aware of any alteration in the level of discourse.

Partly because of the masterly continuity of Werther, and partly because of its large-scale use of reminiscence motifs, critics right from the first tended to discern in it Wagnerian influences. But French music criticism at the time was obsessed with the question of “Wagnerisme”, and all sorts of scores of the period were found to bear his influence. So it is with Werther, whose structural principles essentially represent a tightening-up of Massenet’s own earlier procedures. In his use of reminiscence themes, he is developing a technique employed by French composers as far back as Méhul at the beginning of the 19th century.

Werther went on to become one of the composer’s most frequently staged works. Film director Benoît Jacquot’s 2011 production at the Royal Opera House was conducted by the company’s music director, Antonio Pappano, an interpreter of great flexibility and dramatic insight. As the Financial Times wrote, “the outstanding conducting of Antonio Pappano, working with a Royal Opera orchestra on top form, made sure that … Massenet’s opera blazed vividly into life.” It was undoubtedly Pappano’s unique artistry that laid the bedrock for a highly successful musical performance. Rolando Villazón sang the title part, one of opera’s great outsider figures and one of the Mexican tenor’s signature roles, which he first assumed in Nice in 2006 and later at the Vienna Opera in 2008 as well as in Paris; the opera also marked his directorial debut in Lyon in 2011. Of Villazón’s return to Covent Garden for this performance, the Guardian critic wrote: “His artistry is as astonishing as ever, fusing sound, sense and gesture in an uncompromising quest for veracity.” Alongside him the French mezzo Sophie Koch sang the tragically conflicted Charlotte – for her, too, a kind of signature role in which she has been acclaimed in Vienna, Madrid and Paris as well as London. The Japanese Eri Nakamura personified Charlotte’s spirited younger sister Sophie, the Norwegian baritone Audun Iversen her unloved husband Albert, and the distinguished French baritone Alain Vernhes her solidly bourgeois father, the Bailiff.
George Hall
1/2012


Werther à Covent Garden

Créé en 1892, trois mois seulement avant le cinquantième anniversaire de Massenet, Werther est une œuvre de la maturité. Massenet était alors un compositeur très expérimenté et apprécié, qui avait remporté toute une série de succès avec ses opéras – Le Roi de Lahore, Hérodiade, Manon, Le Cid, Esclarmonde –, dont plusieurs jouissaient d’une renommée internationale. Cependant, les origines de Werther remontent assez loin. Paul Milliet, l’un des trois librettistes qui ont signé l’habile adaptation pour la scène lyrique du roman de Goethe, raconte que l’idée lui vint en février 1882 alors qu’il se rendait à Milan avec Massenet et Georges Hartmann, l’éditeur et librettiste occasionnel du compositeur, pour assister aux premières représentations en Italie d’Hérodiade à La Scala. À la fin de la conversation sur le roman de Goethe et les possibilités d’en faire un opéra, on convint que Milliet allait écrire un livret pour Massenet. Il se mit donc au travail, en relation avec Hartmann, et travailla pendant plusieurs années à cette tâche, tandis que le compositeur était occupé par d’autres projets.

Massenet lui-même, dans Mes Souvenirs (publiés en 1912, l’année de sa mort), relate que, lors d’un séjour avec Hartmann à Bayreuth en 1886 pour entendre Parsifal, les deux hommes allèrent ensuite à Wetzlar, le cadre du récit partiellement autobiographique de Goethe. Après qu’ils eurent vu la maison où la vraie Charlotte avait vécu, Hartmann offrit au compositeur une traduction du livre. Massenet, qui datait méticuleusement ses manuscrits, semble en fait avoir commencé son travail sur Werther dès l’été de 1885. Il acheva la partition chant-piano le 14 mars 1887 et fut occupé par l’orchestration jusqu’au 2 juillet.

Werther fut au départ refusé par Léon Carvalho, directeur de l’Opéra-Comique, qui trouva l’œuvre trop sombre. Massenet mit ensuite la partition de côté pendant cinq ans, en attendant des circonstances plus favorables pour la dévoiler. Celles-ci se présentèrent finalement lorsque Wilhelm Jahn, directeur de l’Opéra de Vienne, où Manon avait totalisé plus de cent représentations, lui demanda une nouvelle œuvre.

La composition de la partition commença plus tôt que ne semblent l’indiquer les dates ci-dessus, dès que Massenet eut un texte sur lequel travailler. Quel que soit le livret, il avait l’habitude de l’apprendre par cœur, puis de le mettre en musique dans sa tête, généralement quand il sortait se promener, et de ne noter la musique sur le papier que lorsqu’il en était satisfait. C’est en partie ce qui donne à sa musique, qui colle impeccablement au texte, à la fois sa précision et sa spontanéité. Peu de compositeurs ont mis en musique la langue française avec une telle sensibilité à ses inflexions naturelles et à ses possibilités expressives.

Le raffinement de l’art de Massenet est également illustré d’un bout à l’autre de la partition par la fluidité de la texture et la souplesse formelle. Conçu pour l’Opéra-Comique, Werther s’inscrivait dans une longue tradition où les numéros musicaux étaient reliés par des dialogues parlés, comme dans Carmen (1875) de Bizet. Dans Manon (1884), Massenet avait conservé l’usage du mélodrame – texte parlé sur un accompagnement orchestral –, mais Werther est entièrement dépourvu de texte parlé, et s’il reste essentiellement un «opéra à numéros», avec notamment des airs véritables aux sommets émotionnels, les «raccords» entre ces «numéros» sont si bien déguisés que l’auditeur ne perçoit guère de modification dans les niveaux du discours.

Du fait à la fois de la continuité magistrale de Werther et de l’emploi à grande échelle de motifs réminiscents, les critiques tendirent dès la création à y déceler des influences wagnériennes. Mais la critique musicale française de l’époque était obsédée par la question du «wagnérisme»: elle voulait voir l’influence du maître de Bayreuth dans toutes sortes de partitions contemporaines. Il en fut ainsi avec Werther, dont les principes structurels représentent essentiellement un resserrement de procédés déjà utilisés par Massenet. Et dans son usage de thèmes réminiscents, il développe une technique employée par les compositeurs français dès Méhul au début du XIXe siècle.

Werther devint l’une des œuvres les plus jouées du compositeur. La production mise en scène par le cinéaste Benoît Jacquot, en 2011, à Covent Garden, était dirigée par le directeur musical du théâtre, Antonio Pappano, interprète très sensible et doué d’un grand sens dramatique. Comme l’écrit le Financial Times, «la direction exceptionnelle d’Antonio Pappano, à la tête d’un orchestre du Royal Opera en grande forme, insuffla à l’opéra de Massenet une vitalité flamboyante». Le talent unique de Pappano y est sans doute pour beaucoup dans la réussite de l’interprétation musicale. Rolando Villazón chantait le rôle-titre, l’un des grands solitaires du répertoire et l’un des rôles emblématiques du ténor mexicain, qu’il incarna pour la première fois à Nice en 2006 et de nouveau à l’Opéra de Vienne en 2008 ainsi qu’à Paris; l’opéra marquait aussi ses débuts de metteur en scène à Lyon, en 2011. Évoquant le retour de Villazón à Covent Garden pour cette représentation, le critique de The Guardian écrivit: «Son talent est toujours aussi étonnant, le son, le sens et le geste se mêlent dans une intransigeante quête de véracité.» À ses côtés, la mezzo française Sophie Koch chantait le rôle tragiquement conflictuel de Charlotte – pour elle aussi un rôle emblématique, dans lequel elle a été applaudie à Vienne, Madrid et Paris ainsi qu’à Londres. La Japonaise Eri Nakamura incarnait la fougueuse sœur de Charlotte, Sophie, le baryton norvégien Audun Iversen, son époux délaissé, Albert, et l’éminent baryton français Alain Vernhes, son père résolument bourgeois, le Bailli.

George Hall
1/2012


Werther an Covent Garden

Werther ist ein Werk aus Massenets Reifezeit: Die Oper wurde im Februar 1892 uraufgeführt, nur drei Monate vor seinem 50. Geburtstag, als Massenet bereits ein erfahrener und erfolgreicher Komponist war, der mit seinen hochgelobten Opern – Le Roi de Lahore, Hérodiade, Manon, Le Cid, Esclarmonde – auch international Anerkennung fand. Die Anfänge des Werther reichen jedoch viel weiter zurück. Paul Milliet, einer der drei Librettisten, die Goethes Roman so geschickt für die Opernbühne einrichteten, erzählte, wie die Idee Gestalt annahm, als er im Februar 1882 mit Massenet und dessen Verleger und gelegentlichem Librettisten Georges Hartmann für die italienische Erstaufführung der Hérodiade an der Scala nach Mailand reiste. Am Ende eines Gesprächs über Goethes Roman und dessen Operntauglichkeit kam man überein, dass Milliet ein Libretto für Massenet anfertigen solle. Er ging alsbald an die Arbeit und beriet sich dabei oft mit Hartmann, benötigte für seine Aufgabe allerdings mehrere Jahre, während derer sich der Komponist anderen Projekten widmete.

Massenet beschreibt in Mes Souvenirs (erschienen in seinem Todesjahr 1912), wie er 1886 mit Hartmann erst Bayreuth besuchte, um den Parsifal zu hören, und dann mit ihm nach Wetzlar fuhr, wo Goethes zum Teil autobiografische Geschichte spielt. Nachdem sie das Wohnhaus der historischen Charlotte besichtigt hatten, schenkte Hartmann dem Komponisten eine Übersetzung des Buchs. Es scheint jedoch, als habe Massenet, der seine Manuskripte stets genau datierte, schon im Sommer 1885 mit der Komposition des Werther begonnen. Am 14. März 1887 vollendete er den Klavierauszug und stellte am 2. Juli die Orchestrierung fertig.
Werther wurde zunächst abgelehnt: Dem Direktor der Opéra-Comique, Léon Carvalho, war das Stück zu trübsinnig. Massenet ließ die Partitur daraufhin in der Schublade verschwinden und wartete auf eine bessere Gelegenheit, sie wieder hervorzuholen. Diese bot sich schließlich fünf Jahre später, als Wilhelm Jahn, der Direktor der Wiener Hofoper, wo Manon es auf über 100 Aufführungen gebracht hatte, bei Massenet wegen eines neuen Werks anfragte.

Mit der Komposition hatte Massenet freilich schon früher begonnen, als man nach diesen Jahreszahlen denken könnte, nämlich sobald ihm ein brauchbarer Text vorlag. Normalerweise lernte er das neue Libretto auswendig, vertonte es im Kopf (meist auf langen Spaziergängen) und machte sich erst dann, wenn er so weit zufrieden war, an die Niederschrift. Dies erklärt zum Teil die Präzision und Spontaneität seiner makellosen Textbehandlung. Kaum ein anderer Komponist, der französische Texte vertont hat, ging mit einem derart feinen Gespür für die natürliche Sprachmelodie und die Ausdrucksmöglichkeiten dieser Sprache zu Werke.

Massenets technische Meisterschaft und Flexibilität zeigt sich überall in den geschmeidigen Abläufen und Strukturen dieser Partitur. Werther, als ein für die Opéra-Comique konzipiertes Werk, steht in einer langen Tradition von Opern, in denen die Musiknummern durch gesprochene Dialoge miteinander verbunden werden; ein Beispiel hierfür wäre Bizets Carmen (1875). In seiner Manon (1884) hatte Massenet auch das Melodram eingesetzt, also gesprochenen Text über einer Orchesterbegleitung, aber Werther ist durchkomponiert, enthält also überhaupt kein gesprochenes Wort. Und obwohl das Stück im Wesentlichen eine Nummernoper ist, bei der die Figuren sich an emotionalen Höhepunkten in abgeschlossenen Formen äußern, werden die Nahtstellen zwischen diesen »Nummern« durch fließende Übergänge so geschickt verschleiert, dass man beim Hören kaum einen Wechsel der Diskursebene bemerkt.

Zum einen wegen dieses bruchlosen Ablaufs des Werther, aber auch wegen des großflächigen Einsatzes von Erinnerungsmotiven meinten von Anfang an viele Kritiker, hier den Einfluss Wagners zu erkennen. Allerdings war die französische Musikkritik seinerzeit geradezu zwanghaft fixiert auf das Problem des »wagnerisme«, und in den unterschiedlichsten Partituren entdeckte man seinen Einfluss – so auch in Werther, dessen Kompositionstechnik in Wahrheit aber aus der Straffung von Massenets eigenen früheren Strukturprinzipien erwächst. Indem er Erinnerungsmotive benutzt, entwickelt Massenet ein Verfahren weiter, das in Frankreich schon von Komponisten wie Méhul zu Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts angewandt wurde.

Werther wurde schließlich das am häufigsten aufgeführte Werk Massenets. 2011 kam es am Royal Opera House in einer Inszenierung des Filmregisseurs Benoît Jacquot neu heraus, unter der musikalischen Leitung von Antonio Pappano, Chefdirigent an Covent Garden und ein sehr vielseitiger Interpret mit großem dramatischem Gespür. Wie die Financial Times schrieb: »Das hervorragende Dirigat Antonio Pappanos und das in Bestform spielende Orchester der Royal Opera erweckten … Massenets Oper zu sprühender Lebendigkeit.« Die Basis für den Erfolg dieser Neuproduktion bildete zweifellos Pappanos einzigartige Gestaltungskunst. Rolando Villazón sang Werther, einen der großen Außenseiter unter den männlichen Figuren der Operngeschichte und eine seiner Paraderollen. Erstmals hatte er die Partie 2006 in Nizza gesungen und danach 2008 an der Wiener Staatsoper sowie in Paris wiederholt, und 2011 gab er in Lyon mit dieser Oper sein Regiedebüt. Über Villazóns Rückkehr als Werther ans Royal Opera House schrieb der Kritiker des Guardian: »Seine künstlerischen Qualitäten sind erstaunlich wie eh und je – bei seiner kompromisslosen Suche nach Wahrhaftigkeit verschmelzen Klang, Ausdruck und Gestik zu einer großen Einheit.« An seiner Seite gab die französische Mezzosopranistin Sophie Koch die in tragische Konflikte verstrickte Charlotte – auch für sie ist diese Rolle, die sie mit großem Erfolg schon in Wien, Madrid, Paris und auch London gesungen hat, so etwas wie ein Markenzeichen. Die Japanerin Eri Nakamura verkörperte Charlottes temperamentvolle jüngere Schwester Sophie, der norwegische Bariton Audun Iversen ihren ungeliebten Ehemann Albert, und der exzellente französische Bariton Alain Vernhes sang ihren durch und durch gutbürgerlichen Vater, den Amtmann.

George Hall
1/2012