BRUCKNER Symphony No. 8 / Karajan

ANTON BRUCKNER

Symphony No. 8
Wiener Philharmoniker
Herbert von Karajan
Int. Release 03 Sep. 2012
1 CD / Download
0289 479 0528 8
The Originals


Track List

Anton Bruckner (1824 - 1896)
Symphony No.8 In C Minor, WAB 108

Version Robert Haas 1939

Wiener Philharmoniker, Herbert von Karajan

Total Playing Time 1:22:56

. . . a wonderful reading it is, as authoritative as its predecessors and every bit as well played but somehow more profound, more humane, more lovable . . . For it is the sense of the music being in the hearts and minds and collective unconscious of Karajan and every one of the hundred and more players that gives this performance its particular charisma and appeal . . . The "Scherzo" is full of treasurable instrumental detail. You could surely guess the Vienna Philharmonic was at work from the cushioned pulse, the upbeat touched in but not insisted upon, the mellifluous, Brahmsian cellos and softly hooting clarinet . . . In both "Adagio" and finale Karajan turns up the temperature at unexpected points. I'd call it inspired, inward, almost Verdian conducting of Bruckner . . . at its best, the recording surges with an almost animal impulse that recreates the pull of a live performance and puts most recordings -- by anyone, including Karajan himself in the shade.

. . . memorable . . . this 1988 Karajan account holds a special place . . . In many ways this valedictory Eighth belies expectations. It isn't tightly controlled by comparison with Karajan's fabled abilities in that department. The Adagio alone is a miracle of expression, pacing, and "Innigkeit". The orchestra rises to its magnificent best, and DG's recorded sound is clear and faithful . . . it was in the Eighth Symphony that, for me, Karajan achieved the greatest recording of his last decade . . . Whether one comes to this performance as a doubter or believer, an impalpable "something" runs through it that no other modem recording has.

. . . this 1988 Karajan account holds a special place . . . In many ways this valedictory Eighth belies expectations . . . The Adagio alone is a miracle of expression, pacing, and "Innigkeit". The orchestra rises to its magnificent best, and DG's recorded sound is clear and faithful . . . it was in the Eighth Symphony that, for me, Karajan achieved the greatest recording of his last decade . . . Whether one comes to this performance as a doubter or believer, an impalpable "something" runs through it that no other modern recording has.