SOKOLOV Schubert & Beethoven

GRIGORY SOKOLOV
Schubert & Beethoven

SCHUBERT:
Impromptus op. 90
Drei Klavierstücke D946

BEETHOVEN:
Piano Sonata in B flat major, op. 106
Int. Release 15 Jan. 2016
2 CDs
0289 479 5426 2
Live from Warsaw and Salzburg


Track List

CD 1: Schubert & Beethoven

Franz Schubert (1797 - 1828)
4 Impromptus, Op.90, D.899

3 Klavierstücke, D.946

Grigory Sokolov

Total Playing Time 1:05:07

CD 2: Schubert & Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827)
Piano Sonata No. 29 In B Flat Major, Op. 106 -"Hammerklavier"

Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683 - 1764)
Premier livre de pièces de clavecin, RCT 1

Suite In D Minor-Major (1724)

Nouvelles suites de pièces de clavecin

Suite in G Major, RCT 6

Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897)
Intermezzi, Op.117

Grigory Sokolov

Total Playing Time 1:13:19

. . . Sokolov offers playing of Apollonian purity . . . His Schubert Impromptus, from another live recording in Warsaw, are crystalline, momentous, Olympian . . . a generous group of Rameau encores is unreal in its perfectly chiselled finesse.

Sokolov's prodigious arsenal of nuances and inhumanly even trills ravishingly come into play throughout the five Rameau encores, while his rhetorical, large-scaled way with Brahms' B-flat minor Intermezzo convinces . . . [Schubert]: The pianist justifies his slow, monumental conception of the C minor Impromptu with carefully scaled dynamics and hypnotically sustained long lines . . . Sokolov takes No. 3 at a true "alla breve" and sings out the beloved melodies in a full-throated, flexible, and heartfelt manner.

. . . he transforms each and every track into a listener's instantaneous personal favourite. Sokolov is capable of making the piano sing in a very particular way. He demonstrates breathtaking sensitivity, a seamless pianistic style and a low key projection that sweeps the listener away . . . All Sokolov's unique qualities make his performance of the "Hammerklavier" a breathtaking event, and I am curious to hear him in the other 31 sonatas of Beethoven . . . The Rameau encores are very interesting as Sokolov maintains a quasi-Romantic approach that happens to work very well. A splendid choice exposing his versatility . . . Mention must be made of the astonishing dynamic sound from both concerts. Although the engineers are different the sound is remarkably similar. As realistic as I've ever heard.

There is brilliant pianism everywhere apparent in the new Schubert . . . the Beethoven achieves a kind of iconic stature from its opening bars. Tempos are broad and expansive, adding several minutes to the lengths of other classic recordings, without giving short shrift to moments of explosive expression in which the sound is veritably symphonic in its fullness. What lingers in memory, however, is the slow movement, where the line is often stretched just up to its breaking point but never beyond, and where the sound glows as if lit from within.

. . . undoubted pianistic mastery . . . there is much beautiful playing . . . twinkling Rameau and dreamy Brahms . . .

Sokolov brings emotional restraint to the Schubert "Impromptus", and what draws me to these performances is his poise and refinement. It's an approach which is certainly attractive . . . The G flat has a seductive charm, and the A flat's middle section has power and passion. The "Drei Klavierstücke D 946" possess a similar spontaneity and freshness . . . No. 3 in C major has terrific syncopated rhythmic drive, with a more sedate contrasting middle section, eloquently delivered . . . [Beethoven 29]: a noble and aristocratic reading, architecturally aware and with a sense of inevitability. The first movement is informed by heroic gesture, and the success of the performance is guaranteed by his pianistic stamina and assured technique. The fiendish octave leaps in the opening measures are clean and accurate. The "Adagio sostenuto" is sublime and profoundly penetrating . . . Sokolov's slow movement is suffused with expressive beauty, arching melodic lines and an unerring sense of direction. The music never sags. In the final fugue, he unleashes titanic forces and, out of the chaotic thickets, brings clarity and logic to the contrapuntal lines . . . Sokolov's Rameau has a striking directness, and he suffuses the individual pieces with an array of tonal colour. All ornamentation is articulated with pristine precision. There's a delicacy and diaphanous quality to Sokolov's Brahms "Intermezzo", and he gives it with warmth and intimacy. The falling arpeggio figures, through the succession of tonalities, are negotiated smoothly, giving the performance exceptional appeal. A superbly engineered disc, the piano sound is warm and sumptuous . . . This is incandescent playing from a charismatic player.

The artistry is undeniable, whether in the astonishing concentration of the slow movement of Beethoven's "Hammerklavier" Sonata, or the drive of opening gallop in the first of Schubert's D. 946 Piano Pieces, or the irresistible ebb and flow of an encore, a Brahms intermezzo.

The first Schubert Impromptu becomes an epic journey in miniature . . . The second goes at such a leisurely pace that every quaver in the unbroken right-hand melody gets due weight in this artlessly convincing treatment . . . and the arpeggiated figurations in the fourth have a lovely evenness. Each of the D946 "Klavierstücke" becomes an essay in fastidiously-controlled moods and colours . . . the opening "Allegro" of Beethoven's "Hammerklavier" is a revelation. The tempo is cool and deliberate, the passagework transparent and graceful, the prevailing mood playful and tender; continuing through the "Scherzo", that playfulness segues into profundity with the "Adagio", where every bar is infused with visionary authority . . . the Rameau encores are as exquisite as you would expect from this great keyboard poet, with whom 18th-century Parisian elegance sits as naturally as Viennese passion; the concluding Brahms "Intermezzo" comes like a benediction on all that has gone before.

Sokolov gives readings of masterpieces by Schubert and Beethoven seasoned by decades of experience . . . Sokolov plays the four Impromptus of the first set, D 899, with due regard for their stature -- his readings are large-scaled and searching . . . as the set progresses with deliberation in tempo and phrasing, one can hear why Sokolov became an adored coterie figure. He imposes an out-sized personality on this music as few, if any, pianists on the current scene can . . . [in the "Drei Klavierstücke", D 946,] Sokolov applies the same heroic style as in the Impromptus, achieving powerful results . . . [Beethoven / Piano Sonata no. 29]: The first movement is taken at a measured pace without banging, bringing a civilized touch to the chaos . . . The scherzo is hardly a Presto in Sokolov's hands, but the Adagio is suitably inward and will promote his devotees' belief that Sokolov is a philosopher of the keyboard . . . The most individuality occurs in the finale, which is handled with poetry and vitality in alternation . . . I'd count it as the most absorbing music-making on the disc . . . [Sokolov offered up a bit of Rameau as an encore,] five exquisitely played miniatures, along with a Brahms intermezzo from the late op. 117 set, played with poetic delicacy . . . The recorded sound is quite fine.

Sokolov's playing is weighty and deliberate, with wide dynamic contrasts that bring out all the pathos and drama of the music . . . [Beethoven's "Hammerklavier" sonata] receives a measured, probing interpretation of mesmerizing power -- one unlike anything you'll have heard before . . . if you like to be challenged, stimulated and surprised, he's your man.

Sokolov gives readings of masterpieces by Schubert and Beethoven seasoned by decades of experience . . . Beautiful legato, refined tone, and nuanced touch . . . [his readings of Schubert's Impromptus are large-scaled and searching . . . as the set progresses with deliberation in tempo and phrasing, one can hear why Sokolov became an adored coterie figure. He imposes an outsized personality on this music as few, if any, pianists on the current scene can . . . [in the Piano Sonata no. 29 the Adagio is suitably inward and the finale] is handled with poetry and vitality in alternation . . . the most absorbing music-making on the disc . . . [the encores include] five exquisitely played miniatures, along with a Brahms intermezzo from the late op. 117 set, played with poetic delicacy.

The first Schubert Impromptu becomes an epic journey in miniature, set in a bleak landscape where emotional restraint is the norm. The second goes at such a leisurely pace that every quaver in the unbroken right-hand melody gets due weight in this artlessly convincing treatment; there's nothing honeyed or hackneyed in the delivery of the third, and the arpeggiated figurations in the fourth have a lovely evenness. Each of the D946 "Klavierstücke" becomes an essay in fastidiously-controlled moods and colours. And in these hands the opening "Allegro" of Beethoven's "Hammerklavier" is a revelation. The tempo is cool and deliberate, the passagework transparent and graceful, the prevailing mood playful and tender; continuing through the "Scherzo", that playfulness segues into profundity with the "Adagio", where every bar is infused with visionary authority, encouraging the listener to dream. The closing fugue unfolds in unclouded serenity: who else would have made it sound like that? Punctuated by audience cheers, the Rameau encores are as exquisite as you would expect from this great keyboard poet, with whom 18th-century Parisian elegance sits as naturally as Viennese passion; the concluding Brahms "Intermezzo" comes like a benediction on all that has gone before.

Schubert spielt Sokolov nahezu ideal: klar abwägend, wohlklingend und rund, mit langem Atem und großer Ruhe. Gegebenenfalls auch schroff und abgründig. Eine Interpretation, die beide Seiten der Musik dieses Komponisten aufregend zusammenfasst.

Er tupft, haucht und streichelt die Töne in die Tasten und verleiht der Musik einen existenziell berührenden Grundcharakter.

Es vibriert, es zischt, es kracht. Sokolov bleibt ein Wunder an pianistischer Bildhaftigkeit und energiegeladener Manualkunst.

Er versteht es, Schuberts Stücke-noch einmal!-zu lichten, ohne sie zu erleichtern oder trivial erscheinen zu lassen. Hohe Schule!

Schubert fließt bei ihm sehr flink, Beethoven strömt mit majestätischer Kraft. Wie sich diese Extreme verbinden, zeigt seine neue CD . . . [Schubert / 4 Impromptus D 899]: Sokolov lüftet sie gut durch, ohne sie schockzufrosten, er analysiert voller Liebe zu Details und zu rhythmischen Akzenten. Stets überrascht er den Hörer mit Extremen, die aber nie aufgesetzt oder maniriert wirken. Die hypnotischen Achtel-Girlanden im Es-Dur-"Impromptu" schwingen wie sanfte Wellen, deren Schaukeln den Hörer fast schwindlig werden lässt. Weniger Sentiment und Romantik, dafür mehr Klarheit und Frische: ein grundsanierter Schubert . . . [Beethoven 29]: Sokolov verliert -- in doppeltem Sinn -- nie die Beherrschung: Er spannt notwendigerweise den ganz großen Bogen. Und es gelingt ihm, diese Spannung von auftrumpfenden Akkordballungen zu Beginn bis zum aberwitzigen und ideenvollen Fugen-Finale aufrecht zu erhalten . . . [seine Aufnahme] bezwingt mit ihrer Geschlossenheit. Von den siebenstimmigen Akkorden gleich zu Beginn bis zu den heiklen Oktaven im Finale stellt schon der erste Satz enorme technische und gestalterische Anforderungen. Dies ist eben keine nette Sonate, sondern Beethovens Achttausender fürs Piano, der jede Menge Kondition, Timing und Übersicht verlangt. Auch wenn der kurze zweite Satz, ein dezentes Scherzo, scheinbar Leichtigkeit verbreitet, bevor es im Presto mit heiklen Oktaven in einen dunklen, leisen Schluss rauscht . . . Alle diese Gegensätze vereint Grigory Sokolov zu einem breiten, aber immer strömenden Fluss, der nicht auf oft überraschende Akzente verzichtet, aber sie stets diszipliniert einbindet in die Logik seiner Darstellung. Keine Bilder einer Ausstellung, keine schönen Stellen, sondern Architektur bildet Sokolov ab: Das Beste, was man mit der Hammerklaviersonate anstellen kann.

Bei Sokolov kann man sich seiner Sache nie gewiss sein, der stets tüftelnde und suchende Künstler geht den Komponisten auf den Grund - und entdeckt dabei meist Neues.

Wie kaum ein anderer Pianist unserer Zeit entlockt das Klaviergenie aus St. Petersburg dem Instrument ungeahnte Klangfarben und dynamische Schattierungen. Beeindruckend, wie kraftvoll und rund er die Fortissimo-Akkorde in Schuberts c-Moll-Impromptu D 899 klingen lässt, während das dritte Impromptu im feinsten Pianissimo erleuchtet.

Genie und Wahnsinn liegen auch beim großen Grigory Sokolov dicht nebeneinander.

. . . man hört Schuberts Impromptus op.  90 und die Klavierstücke D 946, aber auch Beethovens "Hammerklaviersonate" mit höchster Spannung, denn wie immer fesselt Sokolovs Spiel vom ersten Takt an, diesfalls vom einsam hingesetzten G an, mit dem Schubert seine Seelenprotokolle beginnt. Sokolov nimmt sich Zeit, die erzählerischen Details dieser Musik mit vielen kleinen Verzögerungen und innehaltenden Momenten auszukosten, setzt erstaunliche Akzente, indem er etwa das Es-Dur-Impromptu betont non-legato spielt, wovon sich das breit strömende nachfolgende Ges-Dur-Stück wunderbar abhebt. Die bohrende Intensität mancher Augenblicke im ersten der drei nachgelassenen Klavierstücke setzt er wiederum in Gegensatz zu manchen völlig frei wirkenden Passagen: In einem Augenblick meint man beinah, einem einsamen Zymbalspieler in der Puszta zu lauschen, der ganz in sich versunken auf seinem Instrument tremoliert. Freizügiger, also vielleicht "richtiger" kann man mit den Schubert'schen Klangbotschaften gar nicht umgehen.

Eine besondere Spezialität Sokolovs sind seine delikaten Interpretationen von ursprünglich für Cembalo komponierter Barockmusik. Hier sind es im Zugabenteil fünf Stücke von Jean-Philippe Rameau, und jedes für sich ist eine Kostbarkeit.

Es ist dieser direkte Anschlag, die besondere Mischung aus Leichtigkeit und Intensität, die auch jedes noch so schlicht wirkende Schubert-Impromptu zu einem Stück voller Abgründe werden lässt. Wie makellos die Läufe perlen, ist schon beeindruckend genug. Aber darüberhinaus wiederholt Sokolov sich nie, kein Lauf klingt bei ihm gleich, sondern wird in immer anderes Licht getaucht.

Die wohl bedeutendste Klavierveröffentlichung der letzten Zeit.

Langsamer und durchaus sanfter als üblich gestaltet er Beethovens herausfordernde "Hammerklavier"-Sonate op. 106. Hier wird viel Wert auf Klangarchitektur gelegt und eine ungemein dichte Interpretation geschaffen. Unbedingt empfehlenswert!

Der Mann redet nie über sich. Dafür spricht seine Musik - auf dem Doppelalbum mit Schubert-Impromptus, Beethovens "Hammerklaviersonate" und wunderbar innigen Rameau-Zugaben. Den Live-Aufnahmen aus Warschau und Salzburg lauscht man fast andächtig, so viel Gefühl und Ausdruckskraft liegt in ihnen.

Gerade in Schuberts Impromptus D 899 und in den drei Klavierstücken D 946 wimmelt es vor herrlichen Kantilenen, Ausdrucksrafinessen, Klang-Schönheiten, Mehrstimmigkeiten. Alles hat Sokolov genau durchdacht . . .

Fulminante Zeugnisse musikalischen Ausnahmekönnens, das in keine Schublade passt, sondern bis in jede Sechzehntelnote mit strahlender Individualität fasziniert. Schuberts Impromptus D 899 genauso wie die Drei Klavierstücke D 946 reißt Sokolov aus ihrer gemütlichen Biedermeierecke. Bei ihm kristallisieren diese Kleinode zu eisig packenden, überraschend visionären Verzweiflungsmusiken . . . [Beethovens gewaltiger Hammerklaviersonate lässt er] von innen heraus brennen und zieht einen am Ende geradezu hypnotisch in die klar aufgespannte Architektur der Schlussfuge hinein. Herrlich verspielter Rameau und ein wohltuend unprätentiös genommenes Brahms-lntermezzo als Zugaben runden dieses Album ab. Ein packendes Hörabenteuer . . .

Wie kaum ein anderer Pianist unserer Zeit entlockt das Klaviergenie aus St. Petersburg dem Instrument ungeahnte Klangfarben und dynamischen Schattierungen. Beeindruckend, wie kraftvoll und rund er die Fortissimo-Akkorde in Schuberts c-Moll-Impromptu im feinsten Pianissimo erleuchtet.

An Sokolovs Schubert-Interpretation, zu denen sich noch die drei kostbaren Klavierstücke D 946 gesellen, überrascht am wenigsten die Detailgenauigkeit, mit der der Pianist jeden Ton subtil artikuliert und jede Phrase überlegt entfaltet.

Man erlebt im Interpreten einen Wesensverwandten des Komponisten und seines Klavierspätwerks. Nirgendwo fallen vollendetes Glück und unsagbares Leid so kompromisslos zusammen. Das c-Moll-Impromptu in seiner schweren Schreitmotivik spielt Sokolov wie einen eigenen "Winterreise"-Zyklus, die perpetuierenden Triolen hämmern sich tieftraurig in die Seele.

Sokolow spielt Werke von Schubert, Rameau und - als Höhepunkt - Beethoven, dessen Hammerklaviersonate nur noch Staunen macht. Ganz große Kunst.

Kräftig mit der Pranke langt Sokolov in der Hammerklaviersonate op.106 von Ludwig van Beethoven zu, so dass die Schroffheit und die Macht der Tonsprache mit unerbittlicher Konsequenz zur Geltung kommen.

Das vermeintlich Kleine erscheint groß und weit, als siebenteilige Folge einer wunderbaren, seelentiefen Schubert-Fantasie. Sokolov verfügt über stupende Technik, die Läufe des As-Dur-Impromptus etwa erklingen ansatzlos verzaubernd - und eben irgendwie heilig.

Der große Reservierte unter den globetrottenden Pianisten, Grigory Sokolov, breitet Schuberts Impromptus D 899 und die Klavierstücke D 946 sowie Beethovens fast einstündige ¿Hammerklaviersonate¿ in raumgreifender Weite, Länge und
Tiefe aus, dezidiert und unverschwurbelt, klug empfindend, von jedem Manierismus frei.

Existenziell berührend . . . Kein Ton ist beliebig, keine Farbgebung zufällig, Schicht um Schicht wird der Notentext freigelegt.

Schubert-Impromptus, hinreißend fein, Beethovens Hammerklavier-Sonate, entzückende Zugaben von Rameau und Brahms.

Mit jähen Dynamikwechseln, höchst individuellem Beschleunigen und Verlangsamen verpasst er dem Thema immer wieder ein Fragezeichen. Entschieden formuliert er die Aussichtslosigkeit in der unruhig-repetierenden Stakkato-Begleitung und lässt versöhnliche Momente ins Leere laufen.

Selten erwischt man einen Konzertplatz, der einem so intime Einblicke gewährt wie die sanft um den Pianisten Grigory Sokolov herumschwebende Kamera von Martin Bär, der unter der Regie von Bruno Monsaingeon ein Recital in der Berliner Philharmonie so kongenial mitfilmte, dass man sich ganz nah dran fühlt an den Schubert-Impromptus, an Ludwig van Beethovens Hammerklaviersonate, dem zweiten Intermezzo von Brahms sowie einigen bezaubernden Stücken von Jean Philippe Rameau.

An Sokolovs Schubert-Interpretationen, zu denen sich noch die drei kostbaren Klavierstücke D 946 gesellen, überrascht am wenigsten die Detailgenauigkeit, mit der der Pianist jeden Ton subtil artikuliert und jede Phrase überlegt entfaltet.

Bei Miniaturen des Komponisten Jean-Philipp Rameau offenbart sich seine Klavierkunst zudem in schier unerschöpflichen Schattierungen.

Alles große Kunst! Ganz große Kunst! . . . Seine seltenen Auftritte werden gefeiert wie die Erscheinung des Messias . . . Meilensteine der Interpretations- und der Aufzeichnungskunst . . . Makellose Interpretation.


. . . [Schubert]: il concoit le premier "Impromptu" comme un ample drame psychologique dont il nous dévoile les abîmes et les terreurs, faisant appel à une infinie palette de sonorités, de rubatos, alternant précipitations et infinies retenues . . . [Beethoven 29]: voilà une lecture qui changera bien des visions sur l'ouvrage trop souvent joué comme un bloc de béton.

. . . référence indispensable du maître russe . . . nous sommes en présence d'un artiste qui ne connaît pas de faiblesses digitales et se situe dans une quête d'absolu. Rien n'est laissé au hasard et pourtant, son jeu, profondément sincère, déploie une fluidité constante. A travers l'ensemble des répertoires joués, le piano projette un spectre de nuances extrêmes tandis que le dosage minutieux des dynamiques et des tempi porte loin le discours. Pour chaque oeuvre, certains passages nous entrainent, sans prévenir, dans des décrochages émotionnels dont l'intensité se révèle bouleversante. Entre ombre et lumière, Schubert frappe ainsi par sa modernité notamment à travers ses "Klavierstücke" ou le premier impromptu, poignants de beauté . . . [avec la redoutable "Hammerklavier", Sokolov laisse] parler toute sa science digitale. L'unité d'ensemble est agencée avec contraste et cohérence. De bout en bout, l'équilibre des voix de la Fugue captive. Quant au Largo, il reste le moment de grâce du disque. Le temps semble soudain suspendu en apesanteur. Cette version-là a sa place auprès des références du genre dans le cercle fermé des Richter, Brendel, Pollini . . . Vient ensuite une série de bis qui constitue un choix des plus réjouissants dont Rameau et un cycle de pièces écrites à l'origine pour clavecin. ‎Sonorité charnue, toucher délié, une main gauche qui "swingue" . . . La partition prend vie avec immédiateté à l'image des "Cyclopes ou les Sauvages", confondants de fraîcheur. Le pianiste efface le superflu pour ne s'intéresser qu'a la ligne mélodique, irrésistible avec ses envolées rythmiques et expressives. Le dernier bis, l'Intermezzo no. 2 de Brahms est tout simplement renversant de profondeur et de mystère. De là à dire que cette pièce justifierait à elle seule l'acquisition de cet enregistrement, il n'y a qu'un pas. Le choix idéal du tempo permet une respiration d'ensemble qu'on aimerait entendre bien plus souvent. Le phrasé étiré sublime le ton confidentiel mais aussi la polyphonie de Brahms dans ses moindres silences. La chaleur du live nous donne par ailleurs l'impression d'être présent dans la salle.

. . . il s'agit d'un disque important où l'on retrouve la sonorité et la dramaturgie musicale qui fondent la légende d'un pianiste singulier entre tous . . . [dans la labyrinthique "Hammerklavier" le fameux appel initial] sonne comme s'il était joué à l'orgue, et les développements contrapuntiques filent avec une belle clarté . . . Après un Scherzo conciliant légèreté de la ligne et densité de la sonorité, le pianiste semble enclin à laisser les incantations énigmatiques du mouvement lent se développer sans excès de sophistication. C'est la grande réussite de cet album . . . En bis, une poignée de pièces de Rameau où Sokolov donne libre cours à sa fantaisie dans des ornements très raffinés ou capricieux, toujours étincelants.

  • Grigory Sokolov - Schubert & Beethoven - Album Trailer

    For his latest album, Grigory Sokolov plays late masterworks by Schubert, including the much-loved Impromptus, and Beethoven’s mighty “Hammerklavier” Sonata, finishing with six impeccable encores by Rameau and Brahms. The album is released in January 2016.