BACH Víkingur Ólafsson

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

Solo Piano Works
Víkingur Ólafsson
Int. Release 07 Sep. 2018
1 CD / Download
0289 483 5022 3


Tracklisting

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750)
Prelude & Fughetta in G Major, BWV 902

Prelude and Fughetta in G Major, BWV 902

1.
3:26

Prelude & Fugue in E Minor (Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I, No. 10), BWV 855

3.
2:03

4.
1:17

Organ Sonata No. 4, BWV 528 (Transcr. by August Stradal)

Organ Sonata No. 4 in E Minor, BWV 528 (Transcr. by August Stradal)

Prelude & Fugue in D Major (Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I, No. 5), BWV 850

6.
1:03

7.
1:46

Prelude & Fugue in C Minor (Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I, No. 2), BWV 847

9.
1:24

10.
1:38

Aria variata (alla maniera italiana) in A Minor, BWV 989

12.
1:51

14.
0:56

15.
0:55

21.
1:08

22.
1:47

23.
1:19

Suite from the Partita No.3 in E Major for Solo Violin, BWV 1006 (Transcr. by Sergey Rachmaninov)

26.
2:48

Prelude & Fugue, BWV 855a (Transcr. by Alexander Siloti)

Concerto in D Minor, BWV 974

30.
2:17

31.
4:10

32.
3:31

Fantasia & Fugue in A Minor, BWV 904

34.
3:55

35.
5:14

Víkingur Ólafsson

Gesamtspielzeit: 1:17:25


  • Víkingur Ólafsson - Johann Sebastian Bach - Prelude and Fugue in D major BWV 850 – Yellow Lounge

    Pianist Víkingur Ólafsson performs Johann Sebastian Bach - Prelude and Fugue in D major BWV 850 at Musikbrauerei Yellow Lounge in September 2018.


  • Víkingur Ólafsson - J.S. Bach: Prelude & Fugue, BWV 855a - 1. Prelude No. 10 in B Minor (Transcr. by Alexander Siloti)

    Víkingur Ólafsson teamed up with director Magnús Leifsson to shoot the music video to J.S. Bach's Prelude & Fugue, BWV 855a - 1. Prelude No. 10 in B Minor (Transcr. by Alexander Siloti) in a fish processing plant in Iceland. The chosen location is an Icelandic fish processing plant, complete with grand piano. They use the fish, an early Christian symbol, to allude to the mysticism and timelessness of Bach’s music – as changeable as water, it has to be understood at a metalevel, given the many different ways in which composition, transcription and performance can be interwoven. “Everything is there in Bach’s music,” says the pianist, who transports the composer’s keyboard writing to new shores on his latest recording.


  • Víkingur Ólafsson - J.S. Bach: Concerto in D Minor, BWV 974 - 2. Adagio

    Ólafsson’s second Deutsche Grammophon album, the pithily entitled Bach, contains a mixture of original works and transcriptions, which the pianist has woven together in intriguing style. “Everything is there in Johann Sebastian’s music: architectural perfection and profound emotion,” says Ólafsson. In his hands, the universe that is Bach shines with new light.


  • Víkingur Ólafsson - Johann Sebastian Bach (Interview 1)

    Víkingur Ólafsson's second Deutsche Grammophon album, the pithily entitled Bach, contains a mixture of original works and transcriptions, which the pianist has woven together in intriguing style. Here, he explores Bach's Prelude, BWV 855a (Transcribed in by Alexander Siloti).


  • Víkingur Ólafsson - Johann Sebastian Bach (Trailer)

    “…Through its inherent openness, Bach's keyboard music has become something of a musical mirror for different generations of pianists in the modern age, clearly reflecting the tastes and values of each time. While some works go in and out of vogue, others enjoy a stable popularity but undergo radical changes in the way they are understood and interpreted. Bach today generally sounds quite different from Bach 30 years ago, and still more different than Bach 50 years ago. In that sense his music is contemporary rather than classical. It has the potential to feel more or less as new today as it did 300 years ago...” Víkingur Ólafsson


  • Víkingur Ólafsson - Johann Sebastian Bach (Teaser)

    For his new Deutsche Grammophon album, Icelandic pianist Víkingur Ólafsson explores the wellspring of Johann Sebastian Bach’s keyboard music, delivering experimental, innovative and timeless performances. Ólafsson first made the classical world sit up and listen in early 2017 with his recording of solo piano works by Philip Glass – a fascinating journey through the time and space of their minimalist structures. Glass is now followed by Bach.