BEETHOVEN Piano Sonatas / Perahia

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Piano Sonatas Nos. 14 & 29
Murray Perahia
Int. Release 09 Feb. 2018
1 CD / Download
0289 479 8353 8


트랙리스트

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827)
Piano Sonata No. 29 In B Flat Major, Op. 106 -"Hammerklavier"

Piano Sonata No. 14 in C-Sharp Minor, Op. 27 No. 2 "Moonlight"

Murray Perahia

총 재생시간 55:39

. . . [Piano Sonata no. 29]: energised and propulsive . . . I don't think I have ever heard a recording of the first movement which sweeps the listener along with such a sense of cohesive inevitability; ten minutes seem to pass in a flash and every moment is riveting, Perahia's fleeting application of rubato enlivening certain phrases despite the speed of his delivery. The Scherzo is similarly rapid, devilish and mercurial. The third movement is perfectly paced as a true Adagio . . . thus the music unfolds with grace and profundity without courting stasis. The languid, limpid, lilting beauty of his playing here implicates Beethoven as a Romantic forerunner of Chopin rather than the firebrand of the "Eroica". Perahia perfectly captures the hesitant, ambivalent mood of the slow introduction to the finale, then segues seamlessly into the fugue, unloosing a torrent of astonishingly well-articulated runs which are always urgent but never rushed. Everything about his playing of the "Moonlight" Sonata is equally well judged; sentimentality and indulgence are eschewed in the first movement whose Adagio tempo, as in the "Hammerklavier", is just right. The Allegretto is light, winsome and "keck"; Perahia sees no need to apply a pianistic sledgehammer to this sweet nut -- but the left hand keeps us sternly grounded. The Presto conclusion is thrilling, sharing the same prestidigitatory virtuosity as the finale to Op. 106, and there is never any suggestion of Perahia losing control. Perahia's "Hammerklavier" has integrity in every sense of the word and the "Moonlight" here is a dream; this disc represents the summation of a lifetime's experience.

Murray Perahia opens the "Moonlight" Sonata serenely and softly . . . offering something sustained and transporting (impressionism before the term was coined). The remaining two movements follow attacca, an airy intermezzo perfectly paced and shaped, and then the tempestuous Finale (a precursor to a silent-film score) is attacked at speed and vividly, Perahia's fingers nimble and accurate . . . [Piano Sonata no. 29]: The outer movements come off best, the first (repeat observed) an imposing mix of grandeur and controlled impetuosity -- fiery, lyrically charged and dynamic -- and the madcap Finale, fugal insanity, is brought off magnificently with intensity and also moments of breathing space that monumentalise the music to reveal the Bach that lurked within Beethoven . . .

With sonatas as often recorded as these, and by so many great pianists, it's idle to talk of best recordings. All I really need to say is that with great music like this, any serious collector will want more than one recording, probably several. Perahia should join that select group . . . these two sonatas last only 55 minutes. But I imagine Perahia didn't feel there was anything else he wanted to set down worthy of permanence. Credit to him for that, I suppose.

. . . Murray Perahia est revenu en grande force, ainsi qu'en témoigne cette lecture récente dans laquelle la vigueur alterne avec des moments d'intense introspection, toujours dans son phrasé et son articulation impeccables et si profondément musicaux. Les années pendant lesquelles le pianiste du Bronx s'est astreint à un régime consistant presque exclusivement en l'oeuvre de Bach en attendant la guérison auront été d'une immense richesse après tout.

Si la "Clair de lune" est un modèle d'équilibre et de grâce, c'est surtout sa "Hammerklavier", à la fois pleine d'énergie et d'un classicisme parfait, qui s'impose au sommet de la discographie . . . Le retour de Murray Perahia au disque, sous l'étiquette jaune désormais, se révèle tout bonnement miraculeux. Après des Suites francaises de Bach somptueuses, le voici qui nous livre deux sonates de Beethoven inédites dans sa discographie, et non des moindres. Il vaut mieux, à notre sens, commencer l'écoute de ce disque par la Sonate "Clair de lune", d'un galbe parfait, d'un équilibre des proportions miraculeux et d'une beauté plastique absolue. L'oeuvre, pourtant tant rabâchée, y gagne une fraîcheur et une pureté nouvelles qui nous éblouissent comme si nous la découvrions. Mais le grand moment de ce CD est l'interprétation de la "Hammerklavier", ce monument sur lequel tant de grands pianistes se sont cassés les dents. Perahia en livre une lecture d'une grande clarté, d'un élan irrésistible dans le premier mouvement avec son entame héroïque et grandiose, et d'une intensité prenante dans l'adagio -- dont il ne cherche pas à ralentir le tempo comme s'il s'agissait d'un adagio de Bruckner avant la lettre. Ici, le mouvement avance toujours malgré l'intensité de son recueillement. Quant à la redoutable fugue finale, il parvient à en démêler l'écheveau contrapuntique avec une clarté réelle, en dépit de la terrible densité de l'écriture . . . Perahia affirme la perfection du classicisme dans cette interprétation nouvelle de ces sonates, un ajout de taille à sa discographie.

  • Piano Sonata No. 29 In B-Flat Major, Op. 106, 2. Scherzo. Assai vivace

    “The challenge of this music is still alive because one can get deeper and deeper into the piece’s mysteries. That’s endless – both musicologically and emotionally. Everything in it is connected. There isn’t a random note, yet it feels improvisatory. So it’s a mystery that will intrigue and occupy musicians forever.” – Murray Perahia.


  • Piano Sonata No. 14 In C Sharp Minor, Op. 27, No. 2 -"Moonlight", 1. Adagio sostenuto

    Murray Perahia, a living legend of piano, records two benchmark sonatas by Beethoven for the first time in his storied career. Watch here his interpretation of Beethoven's “Moonlight Sonata”.


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  • Murray Perahia - Beethoven Sonatas (Interview #3) - Hammerklavier Sonata

    After years of study of original manuscripts, working sketches and editions published during the composer’s lifetime, and having edited the new Henle Urtext edition of the complete Beethoven piano sonatas, Perahia now presents two of Beethoven’s most famous sonatas as a revelation. Learn more about Perahia's interpretation of Beethoven's Hammerklavier Sonata.


  • Murray Perahia - Beethoven Sonatas (Interview #2) - Moonlight Sonata

    Murray Perahia stands in the tradition of the great keyboard virtuosi as an artist armed with consummate technical skills, boundless imagination and near-mystical eloquence. Learn more about Perahia's interpretation of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata and how he draws parallels to Romeo and Juliet.


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    Hear Murray Perahia speak of how the "Moonlight" Sonata fits into the life journey of Beethoven.


  • Murray Perahia - Beethoven: Piano Sonatas (Trailer)

    Murray Perahia, a living legend of piano, records two benchmark sonatas by Beethoven for the first time in his storied career. After years of study of original manuscripts, working sketches and editions published during the composer’s lifetime, and having edited the new Henle Urtext edition of the complete Beethoven piano sonatas, Perahia now presents two of Beethoven’s most famous sonatas as a revelation.